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Topic: ICME: Participation in Working Group
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Michelle Manes

Posts: 64
Registered: 12/3/04
ICME: Participation in Working Group
Posted: Jun 19, 1995 7:18 PM
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I'm posting this information for Al Cuoco. Any requests
for further information should go to him at alcuoco@edc.org

-michelle
************************************************************

ICME 1996 Working Group 15
The impact of technology on the mathematics curriculum.

Chief Organizer: Michal Yerushalmy: yerushmi@hugse1.harvard.edu

Sub-groups Organizers:
Dan Chazan: dchazan@msu.edu
Al Cuoco: alcuoco@edc.org
Koeno Gravemeyer: koeno@fi.ruu.nl

Advisory panel:
Al Cuoco alcuoco@edc.org
John Monaghan J.D.Monaghan@leeds.ac.uk

Technology is currently central in many of the attempts to reform the
mathematics curriculum and is intimately connected with the goals of
creating meaningful mathematics for diverse groups of students.
In ways that would otherwise be unrealistic, technology can be used to
support learners in communicating about mathematics, in constructing
and manipulating mathematical objects, and in carrying out mathematical
reasoning. The development of many new technology-intense
mathematics curricula around the world suggests a serious discussion of
the opportunities and problems raised by widespread use of technology
in school mathematics.

The group will concentrate on three major characterizations of current
technology-intense curriculum reform:
1. Modeling based curricula: curriculum which is organized around "real
life'' applications that create opportunities to learn mathematics. (Koeno
Gravemeyer)
2. Curricula organized around big mathematical ideas: developments
that re-think the organization and the emphases of the classical content
and structure of the curriculum. (Dan Chazan)
3. Curricula organized around new themes and topics: developments
that suggest that classical and modern topics, previously considered
advanced, can be made accessible through the use of technology. (Al
Cuoco)



The ideas we would like to address include:

-What are the important factors in choosing a technology-intense curriculum?

-How might such curriculum organized?

-What are the mathematical objectives of such a curriculum?

-How does the use of technology affect the definition of basic skills in
mathematics?

-In what ways can technology be used to help students apply mathematics they
already know? To construct new mathematical ideas?

-How do computer tools affect connections among various branches
of mathematics?

-What is the role of technology in curriculum that support traditional (proof,
for example) and less traditional (conjecturing) modes of mathematical
reasoning?

-What are possible effects of new electronic curriculum structures (electronic
databases or Internet uses, for example)?

-How might assessment of technology intensive curriculum be carried out?

-How should teachers' preparation reflect such reformed curriculum?

Organization:
We invite early submission of short abstracts (up to 10 lines) of relevant
suggestions by email to help give us a sense of the interests of possible
contributors and participants. Suggested contributions should involve
current, recent, or future curricular development which uses
technology, and they should be submitted to the organizer of the
appropriate subgroup. Work relating only to software development will
not be discussed unless such development is integrated into the
curricular considerations of the topics suggested above.






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