Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Education » math-teach

Topic: Sketchpad vs Cabri = RPN vs Algebraic Entry
Replies: 1   Last Post: Jun 21, 1995 12:55 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
M.J.Winter

Posts: 24
Registered: 12/3/04
Sketchpad vs Cabri = RPN vs Algebraic Entry
Posted: Jun 20, 1995 1:46 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

To return to an earlier discussion of which comes first, the object or
the action:
If I'm exploring a geometric situation, I find it more
convenient to look at the list of things I might do, decide on one, then
select the object. It has always appeared to me that the Sketchpad
approach assume that you know in advance exactly what yu want to do.
During a demonstration of the HP38 today (we are seriously
considering adopting it for our algebra and beginning calulus courses),
the HP rep said that one of their first considerations in developing the
device was to get rid of Reverse Polish. It occured to me that RP, in
which one decides:
I have a 6 (enter)
I want to take a 5 (enter)
then add it (push +)
is similar to the approach of the Sketchpad. One "selects" the 5, then
"uses" the +. The algebraic entry is to type 6 + 5 (enter)
The market has selected algebraic entry as more natural and
easier to use. If there is a parallel, then it would appear that Cabri's
approach is more user-friendly, if not more natural.
imho, that is.
MJW

Professor M. J. Winter email: winter@mth.msu.edu
Department of Mathematics fax: 517.432.1562
Michigan State University telephone: 517.353.6337
East Lansing, MI 48824 http://math.msu.edu:80/~winter/






Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.