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Topic: PART VIII: To Touch the Future
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Jerry P. Becker

Posts: 13,746
Registered: 12/3/04
PART VIII: To Touch the Future
Posted: Jan 28, 2000 11:36 AM
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Note: This is Part VIII of the report To Touch the Future. You should have
received parts I-VII earlier. The next posting will present the Action
Agenda for Presidents of Colleges and Universities.
After that, I hope to write a final note about what we are doing in our
Teacher Education Program here at Southern Illinois University Carbondale,
in light of the report. The Chair of the National Task Force that prepared
To Touch the Future is the President of my university system and he
appointed the person who is the Interim Chancellor of our campus.
***************************************************

NUMBER 10: The professional environment in which teachers work is
inadequate to attract and retain enough high quality individuals to meet
demand.

One of the key determinants of the attractiveness of a career for new
college graduates is the starting salary they can expect to command and the
opportunities for salary advancement in the future. Salaries paid to
education graduates compare poorly with salaries offered to their
classmates in other
majors (see Figure 4 below). The differential is upwards of 50 percent in
many cases.

Similarly, many schools do not offer sufficiently amenable, competitive
work settings to attract and retain highly qualified teachers. In stark
contrast to workplaces in most public and virtually all private
professional enterprises, many school facilities are outdated, poorly
maintained, and technologically obsolete; few school teachers have offices
or access to private telephones, private computers, or administrative
support; supplies, up-to-date textbooks, computer software, and other
necessary teaching materials often are inadequate; and the social
environment for new teachers within the schools, among parents of school
children in the community, and in relation to their colleges and
universities often is unsupportive.

Teacher mobility also is an issue. The labor markets for teachers are
dramatically more localized than for most other professions. Because of
disparities in state licensure requirements, and because of the lack of
portability of pension fund investments, prospective teachers often are
unable to get jobs, or unwilling to take them, in geographic areas in which
they might otherwise want to work. On average, four out of five newly
trained teachers take jobs in the state in which they were prepared (Ballou
& Podgursky, 1997). Transfers from out of state comprise less than 10
percent of all school system hires (NCES, 1996a).
----------
Fig. 4 - Average Annual Salary of 1992-93 Degree Recipients in April 1997.

Engineering ..............................$44,524
Health Professions ......................$39,421
Mathematics & Other Sciences .........$38,148
Business & Management ...............$37,454
Social Science ............................$35,536
Public Affairs/Social Services ..........$30.563
Humanites ................................$30,179
Biological Sciences ......................$29,331
Psychology ...............................$28,197
History ....................................$28,147
EDUCATION ............................$26,513
[Source: McCormick et al., 1999]
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A number of strategies could be undertaken to recruit teachers from wider
geographic areas, such as establishing greater licensure reciprocity
between states; using on-line technologies for job recruitment, job
information, and job applications; nationalizing teacher searches; and
streamlining hiring procedures (Darling-Hammond, 1999). Raising salaries,
improving working conditions, developing induction programs, and recruiting
new teachers from wider geographic areas are all means of increasing the
supply of qualified teachers and broadening the labor market for teachers'
services.

*****************************************************
Information about the report is available on the American Council of
Education's website:
http://www.acenet.edu/

Title: To Touch the Future - Transforming the Way Teachers Are Taught
Year: 1999
Published by: American Council on Education
One Dupont Circle NW
Washington, D.C. 20036-1193
Ordering: $15.00
[10 or more copies are $10 each, 100 or more copies are
$5 each.]
Orders must be prepaid by money order or check (made out
to the ACE) and sent to:

ACE Fulfillment Service
Department 191
Washington, D.C. 20055-0191

or call (301) 604-9073
The whole report can be downloaded from the website at
http://www.acenet.edu/ . If you go to the website, you can see how to do
this.
***********************************************************


Jerry P. Becker
Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901-4610 USA
Fax: (618) 453-4244
Phone: (618) 453-4241 (office)
(618) 457-8903 (home)
E-mail: jbecker@siu.edu

mailto://jbecker@siu.edu





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