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Jerry P. Becker

Posts: 13,285
Registered: 12/3/04
Best Schools in U.S. / Tabulaton by States
Posted: Mar 15, 2000 11:27 AM
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***********************************************************
Note: This posting is a little long, but might be interesting reading.
***********************************************************
From Newsweek, March 13, 2000; also from the AMTE Listserve, March 15,
2000. [RayM <raypublk@san.rr.com>
See http://www.newsweek.com/nw-srv/printed/us/so/a16951-2000mar4.htm
**************************************************************

The Best High Schools [in the U.S.]

Challenging kids by encouraging them to take tough high-school courses
produces students who can succeed later in college

By Jay Mathews

Nick Freeman, an honor-roll student at Clayton A. Bouton High School in
the hilly Albany suburb of Voorheesville, N.Y., had nearly a 90 average in
social studies and English. Last spring a counselor urged him to sign up
for Advanced Placement (AP) U.S. history because it would be wonderful
preparation for college. He could indulge his love of political argument
and writing. But school administrators said no. The AP course was only for
A students. No B-plus wanna-bes, no matter how motivated, could get in.

At about the same time, 3,000 miles away in the worn linoleum halls of
Inglewood High in South-Central Los Angeles, Rasheda Daniel was learning
that despite her hard work in the very same AP history course, she would
not be able to take the AP test necessary to earn college credit. It cost
$50, even with the discount for low-income families. With her mother
temporarily out of work, she did not have the money. Later Daniel learned
that test-fee grants had been available, but no one in her school-as
ignorant of the importance of academically challenging courses and tests as
suburban Voorheesville-had told her.

For decades, American educators have been giving high-school students like
Freeman and Daniel the message that they should not challenge themselves
too much. The prevailing view is that average students in suburban schools,
and even the best students in urban schools, risk failure, depression and
tarnished transcripts if they try to get ahead of themselves and take
college-level courses like AP or International Baccalaureate (IB). Students
who defy such professional skepticism are often left to struggle on their
own.

Now that attitude among educators is beginning to change, at least at the
state and federal levels. In just the last year, new research and a series
of legal and political developments have turned AP and IB courses,
erstwhile academic boutiques for a thin upper slice of students, into
instruments for social and educational change in the nation's 25,000 high
schools. The doors to brain-expanding classes like calculus and European
history are opening to students previously assigned to business math and
sports literature, even though many teachers remain convinced that such
challenges are too much of a strain for some.

Many Americans have never heard of AP or IB, the only two international
high-school programs that consistently demand wide reading and rigorous
thought. The list of high schools shown here ranks schools that try the
hardest to involve students in these courses and tests, very different from
the way schools are usually measured by test scores and college
acceptances. AP and IB began with a very limited goal-to give prep-school
students and diplomats' children more to do in their spare time than hang
out at coffee bars or play golf. But in the last 25 years, these programs
have evolved into proven devices for inspiring first-rate academic work by
even disadvantaged teenagers. The AP and IB examinations are given in about
52 percent of American high schools each May. They take hours to complete
and go against America's "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" obsession with
multiple-choice tests by using essays that must be graded by actual human
beings.

Some teachers and parents complain that letting students like Freeman and
Daniel take AP or IB courses will lower standards. Some A-plus students
cringe at the questions B-average classmates ask AP teachers, as if not
getting the lesson immediately were a social blunder akin to dirty hair or
out-of-date sneakers. But the expansion of AP and IB is going ahead all the
same. More than 1.1 million AP tests and 43,017 IB tests were given in
13,000 U.S. schools in 1999. Those numbers are expected to jump much higher
this spring.

At the center of the change is a bespectacled education researcher named
Clifford Adelman. Adelman works for the U.S. Education Department, where he
is known for intense irritability at judgments and policies based on sloppy
data. For the last several years, in both his cluttered office in
southwestern Washington, D.C., and the second-floor study at his house in
Kensington, Md., he has been chipping away at what he considers flawed
assumptions about why minority students struggle in college.

His resulting study, "Answers in the Tool Box," examines the academic
records of a large cohort , of 13,000 students who were followed from the
10th grade in 1980 until they were about 30 in 1993. [see
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/Toolbox/toolbox.html ] It shows that despite the
emphasis college-admissions officers place on high-school grades and scores
and class rank, those are not the strongest predictors of college
completion. What matters instead is how rigorous and challenging students'
high-school courses are, no matter what grades they receive. And the factor
is particularly important in predicting the success of minority students.
Courses like AP and IB, Adelman says, help develop what he calls
"self-directed learning skills." When well taught, he says, such courses
"put students in the position of setting up their own experiments,
searching for their own specialized materials. You don't necessarily learn
that in a regular high-school course."

Teachers and counselors often tell students to put off the most difficult
subjects, like calculus, until college. Adelman's study suggests that is
the wrong advice. Freeman's and Daniel's high schools, for instance, were
essentially telling them this: we can't keep you from going to college, but
we will deprive you of a learning experience that will help you succeed
when you get there. An official at Freeman's school says AP enrollment was
limited because the course, with its recommended small class size, was
expensive to teach. Officials at Daniel's school district failed to respond
to telephone calls and faxes seeking an explanation.

With minority preferences in university admissions abolished in California,
Texas and Washington and retreating elsewhere, federal and state education
officials have decided the best way to help disadvantaged students is to
give them a shot at thought-provoking high-school courses. The Clinton
administration spent $15 million last year on cutting AP and IB test fees,
increasing training for teachers and making more courses available. The
administration has asked Congress for $20 million this year, including
money to put AP courses online.

States are promising more money for districts that want to expand their AP
and IB offerings. Fairfax County in northern Virginia took the unusual step
last year of spending $1.2 million to make sure it would have no Rasheda
Daniels denied a chance to take an AP test. It paid everyone's $76 test
fees and required that all AP students take the examinations. (This has
long been the rule with IB.) Fairfax superintendent Daniel Domenech urged
schools to let in any student who wanted the challenge.

This is not a popular approach among teachers. They say some students do
not develop the intellectual capability to handle such courses until they
are older. They complain of ambitious parents' pushing their children into
courses in which they have no interest.

The solution, AP and IB advocates say, is not barring students from the
courses but enriching the curriculum in lower grades to get them ready. The
San Diego-based organization Advancement Via Individual Determination
(AVID) identifies struggling middle-school students whose academic lives
can be transformed with simple lessons in note-taking and time management.
The Dallas-based O'Donnell Foundation, using an idea pioneered by
University of Texas professor Uri Treisman, finances sessions in which
high-school teachers show their middle-school counterparts what students
need to get ready for AP. Fannie Mack, assistant principal at A. Philip
Randolph High School in New York City, says she realized while creating an
AP English class at that Harlem school that she first had to add muscle to
the lower-level courses. "In the ninth grade," she says, "they were doing
no more than writing autobiographies, reading Anne Frank and 'Raisin in the
Sun' and calling it a day." She spread the word that a student who
struggled in an AP course and failed the AP examination was still better
off than before.

In Rasheda Daniel's case, the failure to find money for her AP test has
sparked a significant legal test of the need for challenging courses.
Invited to dinner at a Sizzler restaurant by American Civil Liberties Union
of Southern California legal director Mark Rosenbaum and a team of law
interns Daniel and another Inglewood student described indifferent
teaching, missing textbooks and limited course offerings. A year later the
ACLU has filed a civil-rights class-action suit against the state of
California for inadequate access to AP courses and tests in hundreds of
schools. Daniel, one of the leading plaintiffs, is determined this spring
to take the history test she missed.

Freeman and his parents, Lucille and John Allegretti-Freeman, got
school-board support to open a second AP class. Nick is now soaring through
World War I and loving every minute of it. He had a 91 in AP history his
last marking period, and seems certain to get a top score on the AP test.
"I was upset when they tried to keep me out of the course," Freeman says,
but that made him appreciate the experience all the more. AP history
teacher Mark Diefendorf "is my favorite teacher," he says. "We have mock
trials on issues like the truth about Columbus, or the big-business leaders
of the 19th century. It's like college. He doesn't spoon-feed us." That's
the kind of education all students deserve.

----------------------------
Part II: Histogram of Top 418 Schools in the U.S.

The tabulation below was done by "RayM" <raypublk@san.rr.com>.

California 86
New York 83
Virginia 35
Florida 29
Texas 25
New Jersey 20
North Carolina 19
Illinois 14
Massachusetts 12
Maryland 10
Michigan 8
Minnesota 8
Colorado 7
Georgia 7
Connecticut 6
Ohio 6
South Carolina 6
Utah 6
Wisconsin 6
Pennsylvania 4
Alabama 3
Missouri 3
Tennessee 3
Washington 3
Nevada 2
Alaska 1
Idaho 1
Kansas 1
Mississippi 1
Montana 1
New Mexico 1
D.C. 1
Arizona 0
Arkansas 0
Delaware 0
Hawaii 0
Indiana 0
Iowa 0
Kentucky 0
Louisiana 0
Maine 0
Nebraska 0
New Hampshire 0
North Dakota 0
Oklahoma 0
Oregon 0
Rhode Island 0
South Dakota 0
Vermont 0
West Virginia 0
Wyoming 0

This is a reasonable size sample. It is not self selected. There's no
obvious heroes. They're reasonably good schools. The data can reasonably be
spot checked by skeptics. Do I have any volunteers to help contact schools
and find out which texts they used; whether the courses were cooperative
learning etc? If so, I'll post or e-mail the parsed list, sorted by state.

------------------------------
Part III: The Top Ranked High Schools -- Entire listing

Newsweek, March 13, 2000

Public schools are ranked according to a ratio devised by Jay Mathews: the
number of Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate tests taken by
all students at a school in 1999 divided by the number of graduating
seniors.

Rank / High School Ratio

1. Stanton College Prep*, Jacksonville, Fla....4.324
2. George Mason*, Falls Church, Va...........3.743
3. Eastside*, Gainesville, Fla.....................3.495
4. Jericho, N.Y.....................................3.455
5. Bronxville, N.Y.................................3.147

6. Nova, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.....................3.128

7. Paxon, Jacksonville, Fla.
2.972
8. Wyoming, Ohio
2.908
9. Mainland Regional, Linwood, N.J.
2.893
10. Alabama School of Fine Arts, Birmingham
2.888
11. Brighton, Rochester, N.Y.
2.740
12. Wheatley, Old Westbury, N.Y.
2.696
13. Manhasset, N.Y.
2.691
14. Palm Harbor*, Fla.
2.681
15. Millburn, N.J.
2.662
16. Highland Park, Tex.
2.651
17. Lyndon B. Johnson, Austin, Tex.
2.650
18. Greeley, Chappaqua, N.Y.
2.617
19. Weston, Mass.
2.587
20. Great Neck South, N.Y.
2.569
21. Great Neck North, N.Y.
2.543
22. University, Irvine, Calif.
2.503
23. South Side*, Rockville Centre, N.Y.
2.495
24. Richard Montgomery*, Rockville, Md.
2.494
25. Langley, McLean, Va.
2.490
26. Princeton, N.J.
2.473
27. McLean, Va.
2.443
28. St. Petersburg*, Fla.
2.439
29. North Hollywood, Calif.
2.420
30. Harding*, Charlotte, N.C.
2.410
31. La Jolla, Calif.
2.406
32. Valley Stream South, N.Y.
2.384
33. Colleyville Heritage, Colleyville, Tex.
2.359
34. Enloe, Raleigh, N.C.
2.346
35. Pittsford Sutherland, Pittsford, N.Y.
2.325
36. Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.
2.317
37. Miami Palmetto, Fla.
2.315
38. Scarsdale, N.Y.
2.281
39. East Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N.C.
2.278
40. Indian Hill, Cincinnati
2.270
41. H-B Woodlawn, Arlington, Va.
2.250
42. Briarcliff, Briarcliff Manor, N.Y.
2.239
43. West Potomac, Fairfax, Va.
2.231
44. Roslyn, Roslyn Heights, N.Y.
2.230
45. Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies, Calif.
2.214
46. Duxbury, Mass.
2.175
47. Sunny Hills*, Fullerton, Calif.
2.164
48. Westwood*, Austin, Tex.
2.146
49. Chagrin Falls, Ohio
2.142
50. Washington, Denver
2.115
51. Edgemont, Scarsdale, N.Y.
2.109
52. Chantilly, Va.
2.106
53. Orange, Pepper Pike, Ohio
2.099
54. Madison, Vienna, Va.
2.095
55. Jordan, Durham, N.C.
2.093
56. Palos Verdes Peninsula, Rolling Hills
Estates, Calif.
2.091
57. Stevenson, Lincolnshire, Ill.
2.065
58. Providence, Charlotte, N.C.
2.060
59. Saratoga, Calif.
2.056
60. Gunn, Palo Alto, Calif.
2.047
61. Oakton, Vienna, Va.
2.035
62. Andover, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
2.027
63. Edina, Minn.
2.024
64. Ardsley, N.Y.
2.018
65. Westlake, Austin, Tex.
2.018
66. Hewlett, N.Y.
2.008
67. School for Advanced Studies, Miami
2.008
68. Schreiber, Port Washington, N.Y.
2.000
69. Kennedy, Bellmore, N.Y.
1.995
70. San Marino, Calif.
1.986
71. King*, Tampa, Fla.
1.985
72. Adamson, Dallas
1.977
73. West Springfield, Springfield, Va.
1.969
74. Fort Myers*, Fla.
1.960
75. Asheville, N.C.
1.955
76. Rye, N.Y.
1.947
77. Solon, Ohio
1.933
78. Mira Costa, Manhattan Beach, Calif.
1.930
79. Croton-Harmon, Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y.
1.919
80. Science Academy of South Texas, Mercedes, Tex.
1.908
81. Menchville, Newport News, Va.
1.899
82. Edison, Fresno, Calif.
1.894
83. Ithaca, N.Y.
1.891
84. East, Denver
1.888
85. Woodson, Fairfax, Va.
1.876
86. Blindbrook, Port Chester, N.Y.
1.875
87. Menlo-Atherton, Calif.
1.852
88. Pittsford Mendon, Pittsford, N.Y.
1.851
89. Fountain Valley, Calif.
1.839
90. Farmington, Conn.
1.837
91. Blacksburg, Va.
1.835
92. Yorktown, Arlington, Va.
1.826
93. Irondequoit, Rochester, N.Y.
1.808
94. Lake Braddock, Fairfax, Va.
1.805
95. Foshay Learning Center, Los Angeles
1.804
96. Stonewall Jackson*, Manassas, Va. (tie)
1.800
96. Lynbrook, San Jose, Calif. (tie)
1.800
98. Beverly Hills, Calif.
1.797
99. Mountain Brook, Ala.
1.795
100. Chapel Hill, N.C.
1.793
101. Grosse Pointe South, Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich.
1.790
102. Mills, Little Rock, Ark.
1.775
103. Arcadia, Calif.
1.771
104. Glen Ridge, N.J.
1.754
105. Southside*, Greenville, S.C.
1.753
106. Conestoga, Berwyn, Pa.
1.752
107. Monta Vista, Cupertino, Calif.
1.752
108. Centreville, Clifton, Va.
1.750
109. La Grange, Ga.
1.744
110. Unionville, Kennett Square, Penn.
1.740
111. South Lakes, Reston, Va.
1.738
112. Tappan Zee, Orangeburg, N.Y.
1.734
113. Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies,
Calif.
1.725
114. Spruce Creek*, Port Orange, Fla.
1.724
115. Whitman, Bethesda, Md.
1.721
116. Dripping Springs, Tex.
1.720
117. Malibu, Calif.
1.712
118. New Trier, Winnetka, Ill.
1.711
119. Marshall*, Fairfax, Va.
1.709
120. Clarence Central, N.Y.
1.709
121. La Canada, Calif.
1.703
122. Fairfax, Va.
1.700
123. Hillsborough*, Tampa, Fla.
1.691
124. Syosset, N.Y.
1.690
125. Myers Park*, Charlotte, N.C.
1.686
126. Lake Forest, Ill.
1.682
127. Chamblee, Ga. (tie)
1.682
127. Pensacola*, Fla. (tie)
1.682
129. Lewiston-Porter, Youngstown, N.Y.
1.680
130. Miramonte, Orinda, Calif.
1.675
131. Mamaroneck, N.Y.
1.669
132. Hinsdale Central, Ill.
1.667
133. Rye Neck, Mamaroneck, N.Y.
1.667
134. Glenbrook South, Glenview, Ill.
1.662
135. Harborfields, Greenlawn, N.Y.
1.655
136. Hall, West Hartford, Conn.
1.645
137. Wootton, Rockville, Md.
1.643
138. Wayland, Mass.
1.643
139. Lincoln Park Academy*, Fort Pierce, Fla.
1.641
140. Coronado, Calif.
1.640
141. Corona del Mar, Newport Beach, Calif.
1.637
142. East Hampton, N.Y.
1.624
143. Wilson Magnet, Rochester, N.Y.
1.624
144. Coral Gables*, Fla.
1.622
145. Robinson*, Fairfax, Va.
1.621
146. Lincoln, Tallahassee, Fla.
1.618
147. New Hartford, N.Y.
1.613
148. Lower Moreland, Penn.
1.609
149. Campolindo, Moraga, Calif.
1.605
150. Washington-Lee*, Arlington, Va.
1.603
151. Grapevine, Tex.
1.602
152. Herricks, New Hyde Park, N.Y. (tie)
1.600
152. Oak Park, Agoura, Calif. (tie)
1.600
154. Lakeside, Atlanta
1.594
155. Cerritos, Calif.
1.590
156. Buchholz, Gainesville, Fla.
1.588
157. Rumson-Fair Haven, Rumson, N.J.
1.586
158. Hayfield, Fairfax, Va.
1.583
159. Half Hollow Hills, N.Y.
1.571
160. Oyster Bay, N.Y.
1.570
161. Williamsville East, East Amherst, N.Y.
1.567
162. Falls Church, Fairfax, Va.
1.566
163. Washington, San Francisco, Calif.
1.563
164. Ridge, Basking Ridge, N.J.
1.562
165. Torrey Pines, San Diego
1.562
166. Midwood, Brooklyn, N.Y.
1.560
167. Dreyfoos School of Arts, West Palm Beach, Fla.
1.553
168. Churchill, Potomac, Md.
1.552
169. Memorial, Houston
1.551
170. Winter Park*, Fla.
1.549
171. Southwest*, Minneapolis
1.549
172. Clarke County*, Berryville, Va.
1.547
173. Garden City, N.Y.
1.540
174. Mount Vernon*, Fairfax, Va.
1.540
175. Banneker, D.C.
1.534
176. Plainview-Old Bethpage JFK, Plainview, N.Y.
1.533
177. Mepham, Bellmore, N.Y.
1.532
178. North Hunterdon, N.J.
1.532
179. Fox Lane, Bedford, N.Y.
1.524
180. King*, Milwaukee, Wis.
1.517
181. Westwood, Mass.
1.515
182. Glass, Lynchburg, Va.
1.515
183. Northport, N.Y.
1.515
184. South Mecklenburg, Charlotte, N.C.
1.509
185. Spartanburg, S.C.
1.501
186. Park City, Utah
1.496
187. Burlingame, Calif.
1.494
188. Miller Place, N.Y.
1.490
189. Walter Johnson, Bethesda, Md.
1.489
190. Piedmont, Calif.
1.480
191. Governor Livingston, Berkeley Heights, N.J.
1.475
192. Austin, Tex.
1.475
193. Brentwood, Tenn.
1.473
194. Dulaney, Timonium, Md.
1.470
195. Commack, N.Y.
1.468
196. Highland Park, Ill.
1.464
197. Mission San Jose, Fremont, Calif.
1.462
198. Palisades Charter, Pacific Palisades, Calif.
1.460
199. Williamsville North, N.Y.
1.460
200. Palo Alto, Calif.
1.459
201. North Shore, Glen Head, N.Y.
1.455
202. Williamsville South, Buffalo, N.Y.
1.452
203. Herndon, Va.
1.451
204. Pelham, N.Y.
1.448
205. Half Hollow Hills West, Dix Hills, N.Y.
1.445
206. Garfield, Seattle
1.445
207. Lynbrook, N.Y.
1.444
208. Webster, N.Y.
1.442
209. Francisco Bravo Medical Magnet, Los Angeles
1.440
210. Bethlehem Central, Delmar, N.Y.
1.439
211. Hirschi, Wichita Falls, Tex.
1.438
212. Cleveland, Reseda, Calif.
1.437
213. Bellaire, Tex.
1.435
214. Acalanes, Lafayette, Calif.
1.434
215. Patrick Henry*, Minneapolis
1.430
216. Cherry Creek, Englewood, Colo.
1.425
217. Los Gatos, Calif.
1.424
218. Sweet Home, Amherst, N.Y.
1.424
219. Marshall Fundamental, Pasadena, Calif.
1.422
220. Plano, Tex.
1.418
221. Cardozo, Queens, N.Y.
1.417
222. Newton South, Mass.
1.416
223. Grosse Pointe North, Grosse Point Woods, Mich.
1.412
224. Auburn, Ala.
1.409
225. Lawrence, Cedarhurst, N.Y.
1.406
226. Murrah, Jackson, Miss.
1.404
227. Valley Stream Central, N.Y.
1.405
228. Wellesley, Mass.
1.403
229. Calhoun, Merrick, N.Y.
1.403
230. Dutch Fork, Irmo, S.C.
1.391
231. Clarkstown South, West Nyack, N.Y.
1.391
232. Byram Hills, Armonk, N.Y.
1.389
233. Shaker Heights, Ohio
1.389
234. West Charlotte, Charlotte, N.C.
1.387
235. Marina, Huntington Beach, Calif.
1.386
236. Lincoln, San Jose, Calif.
1.382
237. Gainesville, Fla.
1.381
238. Central*, St. Paul, Minn.
1.375
239. Lahser, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
1.373
240. Clovis West, Clovis, Calif.
1.366
241. Niles North, Ill.
1.364
242. Capistrano Valley, Mission Viejo, Calif.
1.361
243. Vance, Charlotte, N.C.
1.360
244. McCallum, Austin, Tex.
1.357
245. La Costa Canyon, Carlsbad, Calif.
1.357
246. White Station, Memphis, Tenn.
1.356
247. Bethesda-Chevy Chase*, Bethesda, Md.
1.348
248. Pearl River, N.Y.
1.345
249. Ann Arbor-Pioneer, Ann Arbor, Mich.
1.345
250. Belmont, Mass.
1.344
251. Westlake, Westlake Village, Calif.
1.340
252. Environmental Studies, New York City
1.338
253. Patrick Henry, San Diego
1.336
254. Niskayuna, Schenectady, N.Y.
1.332
255. Lexington, Mass.
1.330
256. Whitefish Bay, Wis.
1.329
257. Madison Memorial, Madison, Wis.
1.329
258. Lee, Fairfax, Va.
1.326
259. Floral Park, N.Y.
1.325
260. Mira Loma*, Sacramento, Calif.
1.324
261. J.E.B. Stuart*, Fairfax, Va.
1.322
262. Woodbridge, Va.
1.321
263. Hillcrest, Dallas
1.318
264. Milton, Mass.
1.318
265. Fitch, Groton, Conn.
1.314
266. Tenafly, N.J.
1.314
267. Smoky Hill*, Aurora, Colo.
1.311
268. Esperanza, Anaheim, Calif.
1.309
269. Conard, West Hartford, Conn.
1.307
270. Independence*, Charlotte, N.C.
1.307
271. Franklin, Los Angeles
1.304
272. Staples, Westport, Conn.
1.301
273. Sleepy Hollow, Tarrytown, N.Y.
1.300
274. Annandale, Fairfax, Va.
1.296
275. South, Torrance, Calif.
1.292
276. Van Nuys, Calif.
1.291
277. Lake Brantley, Fla.
1.289
278. Walton, Marietta, Ga.
1.285
279. Freehold, N.J.
1.281
280. East Islip, Islip Terrace, N.Y.
1.281
281. Bellevue, Wash.
1.279
282. Glenbrook North, Northbrook, Ill.
1.278
283. Montgomery Blair, Silver Spring, Md.
1.277
284. Centennial, Elliott City, Md.
1.274
285. San Mateo, Calif.
1.273
286. Fayetteville-Manlius, Manlius, N.Y.
1.273
287. Fox Chapel, Pittsburgh, Penn.
1.272
288. Valley Stream North, Franklin Square, N.Y.
1.272
289. Watauga, Boone, N.C.
1.270
290. Troy, Mich.
1.261
291. Rio Americano, Sacramento, Calif.
1.260
292. East Brunswick, N.J.
1.258
293. Summit, N.J.
1.258
294. Barrington, Ill.
1.257
295. Foothill, Pleasanton, Calif.
1.256
296. Maine South, Park Ridge, Ill.
1.256
297. Clayton, St. Louis
1.255
298. Scripps Ranch, San Diego
1.251
299. Claremont, Calif.
1.251
300. Livingston, N.J.
1.251
301. John Jay, Cross River, N.Y.
1.250
302. Maury, Norfolk, Va.
1.247
303. Penfield, N.Y.
1.247
304. Atlantic Community*, Delray Beach, Fla.
1.244
305. Amherst Central, N.Y.
1.242
306. Leon, Tallahassee, Fla.
1.241
307. McQueen, Reno, Nev.
1.240
308. Diamond Bar, Calif.
1.237
309. Bemidji, Minn.
1.236
310. Warwick, Newport News, Va.
1.235
311. Brea Olinda, Brea, Calif.
1.234
312. Ossining, N.Y.
1.233
313. Taft, Woodland Hills, Calif.
1.231
314. Newport, Bellevue, Wash.
1.231
315. Desoto, Tex.
1.231
316. Grand Island, N.Y.
1.230
317. Culver City, Calif.
1.230
318. Plano East*, Plano, Tex.
1.226
319. Bozeman, Mont.
1.223
320. Acton-Boxborough, Acton, Mass.
1.219
321. Laguna Beach, Calif.
1.219
322. Bernards, Bernardsville, N.J.
1.210
323. Ladue Horton Watkins, St. Louis
1.208
324. Milton, Alpharetta, Ga.
1.206
325. New Berlin, Wis.
1.205
326. El Camino Real, Woodland Hills, Calif.
1.204
327. Irvine, Calif.
1.200
328. Johnston, Austin, Tex.
1.198
329. Irmo, S.C.
1.197
330. North Salem, N.Y.
1.196
331. Lathrop, Fairbanks, Ak.
1.195
332. Ocean Lakes, Virginia Beach, Va.
1.195
333. Mountain View, Calif.
1.193
334. Bountiful, Doug Lake, Utah
1.192
335. Montville, N.J.
1.188
336. Encinal, Alameda, Calif.
1.187
337. Rowlett, Garland, Tex.
1.186
338. Timberline, Boise, Ida.
1.185
339. Melville, East Setaukit, N.Y.
1.185
340. Oviedo, Fla.
1.181
341. Chattahooche, Alpharetta, Ga.
1.178
342. Homestead, Mequon, Wis.
1.177
343. Amador Valley, Pleasanton, Calif.
1.177
344. Oceanside, N.Y.
1.176
345. Brainerd, Minn.
1.174
346. Anderson School of Arts, Jacksonville,
Fla.(tie)
1.171
346. Groves, Beverly Hills, Mich. (tie)
1.171
348. Watchung Hills, Warren, N.J.
1.168
349. Hopewell Valley Central, Pennington, N.J.
1.167
350. San Jose High Academy, San Jose, Calif.
1.156
351. Douglas, Parkland, Fla.
1.154
352. Deerfield, Highland Park, Ill.
1.152
353. Arroyo Grande, Calif.
1.152
354. Eleanor Roosevelt, Greenbelt, Md.
1.151
355. Los Alamos, N.M.
1.149
356. Grimsley*, Greensboro, N.C.
1.149
357. Santa Monica, Calif.
1.149
358. Okemos, Mich.
1.146
359. Bullard, Fresno, Calif.
1.146
360. Connetquot, N.Y.
1.144
361. Reno, Nev.
1.144
362. Paso Robles, Calif.
1.142
363. Baldwin, N.Y.
1.142
364. Taylor, Katy, Tex.
1.141
365. Southwest Guilford, High Point, N.C.
1.139
366. Longmeadow, Mass.
1.138
367. Davis, Calif.
1.138
368. Northern Highlands Regional, Allendale, N.J.
1.137
369. Cheyenne Mountain, Colorado Springs, Colo.
1.136
370. Los Alamitos, Calif.
1.136
371. Marquette, Chesterfield, Mo.
1.136
372. Libertyville, Ill.
1.134
373. Beaufort, S.C.
1.132
374. Marshall, Los Angeles
1.131
375. Kings Park, N.Y.
1.131
376. Pomperaug, Southbury, Conn.
1.129
377. Brighton, Salt Lake City
1.127
378. Newton North, Mass.
1.127
379. Niceville, Fla.
1.126
380. Alta, Sandy, Utah
1.125
381. Wichita East*, Kan.
1.123
382. Woods Cross, Utah
1.122
383. Viewmont, Bountiful
1.121
384. Eastview, Apple Valley, Minn.
1.120
385. Mount Tabor, Winston-Salem, N.C.
1.119
386. Hillsdale, San Mateo, Calif.
1.117
387. Clements, Sugar Land, Tex.
1.113
388. Palmer*, Colorado Springs, Colo.
1.112
389. El Modena, Orange, Calif.
1.109
390. Irondale, New Brighton, Minn.
1.106
391. Plant, Tampa, Fla.
1.106
392. Vorhees, Glen Gardens, N.J.
1.106
393. Riverside, Greer, S.C.
1.105
394. El Camino, Oceanside, Calif.
1.104
395. Heritage, Littleton, Colo.




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