Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum

Ask Dr. Math - Questions and Answers from our Archives
_____________________________________________
Associated Topics || Dr. Math Home || Search Dr. Math
_____________________________________________

Linear Equations; Rates of Pay


Date: 12/16/97 at 12:29:20
From: michael
Subject: Linear equations

1) 3x-y+z = 0                   2) 2x^2+5y^2-53 = 0  3)x^2+2xy+x = 18
   x+2y-z = -1                     4x^2+3y^2-43 = 0         2x-y = 5
   1/(2x)+2(3Y)-1(3z) = -1/(3)

4) y^2+3xy+3y = -8    5) x^2+3xy-y^2 = -3
    3y^2+xy+y = 8         x^2-xy-y^2 = 1

A carpenter and his assistant working together for 8 hours earn a 
total of $96. One day, the carpenter worked alone for 5 hours and was 
joined by his assistant for the other 3 hours. On that day, they 
earned a total of $81. What are their rates of pay?


Date: 12/16/97 at 16:27:57
From: Doctor Rob
Subject: Re: Linear equations

1) Solve the first equation for z in terms of x and y. Substitute for
   z in the other two equations. Solve the new second equation for y 
   in terms of x. Substitute for y in the new third equation. This 
   will give you one equation in x alone. Solve it for x, and use that 
   solution to figure out y, and use both to determine z.

2) Solve the first equation for y^2 in terms of x^2. Substitute for 
   y^2 in the second equation. This will give you one equation in x^2.  
   Solve it for x^2, and use that solution to figure out y^2. Take 
   square roots to get x and y, and don't forget that either can be 
   positive or negative. There will be four pairs (x,y) of solutions.

3) Start with the second equation, since it has lower degree. Solve it
   for y in terms of x, and substitute in the first equation. This 
   gives you one quadratic equation in x. Solve it for x, getting two 
   roots. Use each of these to figure out the corresponding values of 
   y. There will be two pairs (x,y) of solutions.

4) Solve the first equation for x in terms of y. Substitute the 
   result in the second equation. Expand everything in sight, clear 
   fractions, and bring all terms over to one side of the equation.  
   This is one quadratic equation in one unknown y. Find the roots 
   of this equation. Use these values to find the values of x 
   corresponding to them.  There will be two pairs (x,y) of solutions.

5) You could proceed as above, but there is a cleverer way. Subtract 
   one equation from the other. This will tell you what x*y equals.  
   Solve that equation for y in terms of x. Substitute that back into 
   either of the original equations. Clear fractions. Bring all terms 
   over to one side. Solve for x. Use that value to figure out y.  
   There will be two pairs (x,y) of solutions.

Let C be the carpenter's hourly wage, and A the assistant's hourly 
wage. 8*(C + A) = 96, and 5*C + 3*(C+A) = 81. Use the methods above to 
solve.

-Doctor Rob,  The Math Forum
 Check out our web site!  http://mathforum.org/dr.math/   
    
Associated Topics:
High School Linear Algebra

Search the Dr. Math Library:


Find items containing (put spaces between keywords):
 
Click only once for faster results:

[ Choose "whole words" when searching for a word like age.]

all keywords, in any order at least one, that exact phrase
parts of words whole words

Submit your own question to Dr. Math

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

_____________________________________
Math Forum Home || Math Library || Quick Reference || Math Forum Search
_____________________________________

Ask Dr. MathTM
© 1994-2013 The Math Forum
http://mathforum.org/dr.math/