Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum

Ask Dr. Math - Questions and Answers from our Archives
_____________________________________________
Associated Topics || Dr. Math Home || Search Dr. Math
_____________________________________________

Complicated Computation


Date: 23 Feb 1995 20:55:46 -0500
From: Chris Couch
Subject: Dr. Math from Chris

Could you please answer this math question:

34(67+789(47X79(243-157)76-31)-85)48(34X423)-879= 

If you could answer this I will be amazed!                    
      
Chris Couch
Vernon, BC


Date: 24 Feb 1995 20:35:11 -0500
From: Dr. Sydney
Subject: Re: Dr. Math from Chris

Dear Chris,

        Hello there!  That is quite a question you have!  Let's see if I can
help with a strategy for solving problems like this:  Start with the
innermost parentheses, and just start simplifying.  So, start by figuring
out what 243-157 is.  Then multiply by 47, 79, and 76.  Next, you 
want to subtract 31.  Then you will have simplified the inner 2 parentheses.  
Now you want to multiply this number by 789, and then subtract 85 and 
add 67.  Now you have simplified the inner 3 parentheses.  So, now 
multiply this number by 34, 48, 34,  and 423.  Then subtract 879 and you 
are done!  Yeah!  Whoa!  How tiring this problem is.  I'll let you do the 
work with the numbers--if you want to check your answer, feel free to 
write back.

Hope this helps.  Write back if you have any more questions.

--Sydney, "dr.math"
    
Associated Topics:
Middle School Algebra

Search the Dr. Math Library:


Find items containing (put spaces between keywords):
 
Click only once for faster results:

[ Choose "whole words" when searching for a word like age.]

all keywords, in any order at least one, that exact phrase
parts of words whole words

Submit your own question to Dr. Math

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

_____________________________________
Math Forum Home || Math Library || Quick Reference || Math Forum Search
_____________________________________

Ask Dr. MathTM
© 1994-2013 The Math Forum
http://mathforum.org/dr.math/