Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum

Ask Dr. Math - Questions and Answers from our Archives
_____________________________________________
Associated Topics || Dr. Math Home || Search Dr. Math
_____________________________________________

What is a Stone?


Date: 11/11/2001 at 17:10:58
From: Julie
Subject: English Weight Measurements

Can you tell me what a stone in English measurement is equal to in  
pounds?

Thank you.


Date: 11/11/2001 at 17:41:27
From: Doctor Sarah
Subject: Re: English Weight Measurements

Hi Julie - thanks for writing to Dr. Math.

A good place to look up units is Russ Rowlett's _How Many? A 
Dictionary of Units of Measurement_.  See:

   http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictS.html   

Here's what it says:

stone (st)

a traditional British unit of weight, rarely used in the U.S. 
Originally the stone varied in size, both from place to place and 
according to the nature of the item being weighed. A stone of sugar 
was traditionally 8 pounds, while a stone of wool could be as much as 
24 pounds. Eventually the stone was standardized at 14 pounds 
avoirdupois or approximately 6.35029 kilograms - a convenient size 
because it makes the stone equal to exactly 1/2 quarter or 1/8 
hundredweight. Today the stone is used mostly for stating the weight 
of persons or animals. No -s is added for the plural.


- Doctor Sarah, The Math Forum
  http://mathforum.org/dr.math/   
    
Associated Topics:
Middle School Definitions
Middle School Terms/Units of Measurement

Search the Dr. Math Library:


Find items containing (put spaces between keywords):
 
Click only once for faster results:

[ Choose "whole words" when searching for a word like age.]

all keywords, in any order at least one, that exact phrase
parts of words whole words

Submit your own question to Dr. Math

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

_____________________________________
Math Forum Home || Math Library || Quick Reference || Math Forum Search
_____________________________________

Ask Dr. MathTM
© 1994-2013 The Math Forum
http://mathforum.org/dr.math/