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Memorizing Multiplication Tables


Date: 2/26/96 at 22:22:27
From: john muller
Subject: multiplication tables

I'm a 3rd grade teacher and my lesson is on 6x7 6x8 and 7x8 in 
multiplication.  I only know a trick for memorizing 7x8.  Do you 
have any suggestions for 6x7, 6x8 and any others? 

i.e. the easiest way to remember 7x8 is 7x8 = 56 so 5,6,7,8. 

Please hurry!


Date: 2/27/96 at 13:17:43
From: Doctor Ken
Subject: Re: multiplication tables

Hello there!

Here's one I really like.  To remember 6x8, say to yourself "six 
times eight is forty-eight!"  It's a nice little rhyme.  I mean, 
it's not going to win a literary prize or anything, but I bet 
that if you say it a few times, you'll probably never forget it.

As for 6x7, hmm, let's see.  I actually don't think I have a 
very good one for that.  The way I usually remember it is that 
whenever I think of 42, I just automatically think "oh, that's 
6x7."  Even if I don't need to know that at the time.  What you 
might do is mention the book "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the 
Galaxy,"  in which 42 is "the answer to everything."  If you 
make it a fun little story about 42, that might help stuff sink 
in.

-Doctor Ken,  The Math Forum

    
Associated Topics:
Elementary Multiplication

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