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Converting Fluid Velocity

Date: 09/08/2002 at 23:00:05
From: Lisa Brzezinski
Subject: Metric conversions

In a science practical writeup, I have to convert fluid velocity, 
m^3/s, to linear velocity, m/s, but I don't know how to convert m^3 
to m.

Hope you can help.


Date: 09/09/2002 at 10:50:49
From: Doctor Ian
Subject: Re: Metric conversions

Hi Lisa,

Suppose I have 6 cubic meters of stuff, and I arrange it into a cuboid 
1 meter by 2 meters by 3 meters. 

Now suppose I set the cuboid down on a table, make a mark at one end, 
and move the cuboid until the other end is at the mark. Viewed from 
above, this would look like
  
       
   t=0 seconds     +------+
                   |      |
                   +------+
                          ^

   t=1 seconds            +------+
                          |      |
                          +------+
                          ^

What's the linear velocity? It depends on the axis of the cuboid that 
is parallel to the motion, right? And what's the length of that axis?  
It's the volume divided by the area of the side that is perpendicular 
to the motion. 

Does that make sense? 

- Doctor Ian, The Math Forum
  http://mathforum.org/dr.math/ 
Associated Topics:
College Physics
High School Physics/Chemistry

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