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What Does a Myriagon Look Like?

Date: 10/30/2002 at 23:03:37
From: Stephen Brewer
Subject: Myriagon

I am looking for a picture of a myriagon. I have tried several other 
sites but no luck. If you could be of help it would be appreciated.


Date: 10/31/2002 at 10:23:28
From: Doctor Peterson
Subject: Re: Myriagon

Hi, Stephen.

Take out a compass and draw a circle. That will look identical to a 
regular myriagon, since the 10,000 sides of a myriagon of any 
reasonable size will be too small to distinguish. For example, with a 
diameter of 10 feet (a rather large drawing!), the circumference 
would be 31.4 feet, and 1/10,000 of this, the approximate size of an 
edge of the inscribed myriagon, would be a little more than 1/32 of 
an inch. The flatness of the sides would not be noticeable.

On the other hand, if you don't need a _regular_ myriagon, just make 
a 100 by 100 array of points and do a dot-to-dot on them, maybe a 
zigzag up and down the columns, to connect them all in one loop. That 
will produce an irregular myriagon.

If you have any further questions, feel free to write back.

- Doctor Peterson, The Math Forum
  http://mathforum.org/dr.math/ 
Associated Topics:
High School Triangles and Other Polygons
Middle School Triangles and Other Polygons

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