Template:Anchor

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Usage: Use this template to create anchors to images, sections, etc. To use this template, you must include two things:

1. Use this next to the image: {{Anchor|Reference=anchor1|Link=[[Image:Rabbit.jpg|100px]]}}

  • anchor1 is an example of a possible "reference word" for the anchor.

2. Use this when you wish to refer to the image [[#anchor1|Image 1]]

  • The part that says #anchor1 must begin with a # and match the "reference word" you chose for the image.
  • The part that says Image 1 is what will be displayed in the body text. It could be something along the lines of "Image 1" or "the image of rabbits".

Example

Image 1
Image 1


The Fibonacci numbers can be discovered in nature, such as the spiral of the Nautilus sea shell, the petals of the flowers, the seed head of a sunflower, and many other parts. The seeds at the head of the sunflower, for instance, are arranged so that one can find a collection of spirals in both clockwise and counterclockwise ways. Different patterns of spirals are formed depending on whether one is looking at a clockwise or counterclockwise way; thus, the number of spirals also differ depending on the counting direction, as shown by Image 1. The two numbers of spirals are always consecutive numbers in the Fibonacci sequence.

Nature prefers this way of arranging seeds because it seems to allow the seeds to be uniformly distributed. For more information about Fibonacci patterns in nature, see Fibonacci Numbers in Nature

The Fibonacci sequence was studied by Leonardo of Pisa, or Fibonacci (1770-1240). In his work Liber Abacci, he introduced a problem involving the growth of the rabbit population. The assumptions were

  • there is one pair of baby rabbits placed in an enclosed place on the first day of January
  • this pair will grow for one month before reproducing and produce a new pair of baby rabbits on the first day of March
  • each new pair will mature for one month and produce a new pair of rabbits on the first day of their third month
  • the rabbits never die, so after they mature, the rabbits produce a new pair of baby rabbits every month.

The problem was to find out how many pairs of rabbits there will be after one year.

Image 2
Image 2

On January 1st, there is only 1 pair. On February 1st, this baby rabbits matured to be grown up rabbits, but they have not reproduced, so there will only be the original pair present.

Now look at any later month. June is a good example. As you can see in the image of rabbits, all 5 pairs of rabbits that were alive in May continue to be alive in June. Furthermore, there are 3 new pairs of rabbits born in June, one for each pair that was alive in April (and are therefore old enough to reproduce in June).

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In the previous section, where we saw in Image 2 that the way in which rabbits reproduce ...

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