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Topic: Understanding Distance, Speed, and Time Relationships Using Simulation Software
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Subject:   RE: Understanding Distance, Speed, and Time Relationships Using Simulation Software
Author: TraNemiroff
Date: Aug 24 2007
I agree with the fact that "learning more" doesn't seem to be the issue. I do,
though, believe that some students become more engaged when they can apply the
concepts learned. Maybe it is a developmental trait, the focus on the self, but
it does seem that some younger students are more involved in learning when they
see a connection. Learning more... maybe not, but possibility for a greater
sense of interest...maybe.

On Aug 20 2007, Mathman wrote:
> On Aug 20 2007, Kathy522 wrote:
> When students realize that what
> we are
> working with is actual and potentially found in their
> world, they
> learn more.

What will you do when that is not
> entirely possible?  Some math is abstract, but has application none
> the less.  Well, I suppose it all is if we want to get to the nitty
> gritty.  Natural Numbers are just squiggles on paper that represent
> what is seen.  Any number greater than 9 is dependent on the Arabic
> numeral representation, arbitrary and abstract.  Complex numbers,
> that they will meet later, have uses in electronics [with infinite
> application in their "real world".]  The arithmetic of numbers must
> include radicals as part of the real number system, and that
> arithmetic skill is very dependent upon patterns studied in algebra
> ...which is intrinsically abstract.

Whether or not they "learn
> more" will depend upon a point of view being short term or long
> term.  Their education should be as whole as possible.  To give them
> less is to stunt their academic growth.  That is not to go overboard
> with discussions on abstraction, but to surely include it to some
> degree.  The properties of geometric figures is well worth knowing.
> Their formal derivation is also well worth knowing. ...and so on.

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