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Discussion: Understanding Distance, Speed, and Time Relationships Using Simulation Software tool
Topic: Static graph versus Simulation Tool
Related Item: http://mathforum.org/mathtools/tool/13171/


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Subject:   RE: Static graph versus Simulation Tool
Author: Mathman
Date: Jun 26 2006
On Jun 26 2006, Mylla wrote:
>  The  static graph is a good place to start the activity and analyze
> the data. The simulation tool would increase student interest, and
> give them immediate feedback of their ideas when presented with
> various situations. You would have to present varied and challenging
> problem solving scenarios to get the students to focus on the
> learning rather than the gaming.

I'm curious about the sudden plethora of postings on a similar topic.  Are you
guys all taking the same education course that requires comment on this?

That said, the last comment above is worth a good read.  A tool is a useful tool
only if it can provide something not available elsewhere, or better than can be
available elsewhere.  I'm commenting as a retired high-school math teacher
when I say that I've seen many times young people not able to cope when it stops
being just a game.  The very young have two problems no longer faced by those
who have progressed further.  They must not only learn new ideas, but must also
cope with learning to put them together.  What we see clearly we see only
through hindsight.  If a game helps that in any way, it is an asset.  However,
at some time it must become not a game but a task, with the firm knowledge that
it will pay dividends in the future.

David.

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