Making Estimations in Measurement

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Elementary Lessons & Materials || Contents
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Description:

Children at this age will have difficulty in making accurate estimations in many areas of the curriculum. It is oftentimes hard to visualize a particular size much less know what the correct corresponding measurement would be.

Grades: 1, 2

Educational Support Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Debbie Ballard, The Community School, Ketchum, Idaho

Objectives: Students will be able to

  1. Read a story and participate in a discussion about size, measurement and giant's.
  2. Review the lines and numbers on the centimeter rod and tape.
  3. Estimate what they think their:
    a. height would be.
    b. circumference would be.
    c. length of foot would be.
    This information will be recorded on a graph.
  4. Take measurements of their own height, circumference and length of foot. This is to be done with a partner.
  5. Make estimations of what they think a giant's:
    a. height would be.
    b. circumference would be.
    c. length of foot would be.
    This information will be recorded on a graph.
  6. Some students will estimate how many footsteps it would take their giant to walk to various locations throughout the school. (Example: how many footsteps to the office, community room or to their science room?)
  7. Some students will draw and paint a giant using estimated measurements.
  8. Some students will write a story about a giant.

Activities

  1. The teacher will begin the lesson by reading with students the big book entitled Jack and the Beanstalk.
  2. Teacher and students will share in a discussion about giants, the concept of size, measurement, and making estimations.
  3. Students will make a chart with their teacher where estimations are recorded. This chart will make estimations of what they think their height, circumference, and length of foot will be.
  4. Students will review the use of a centimeter rod and tape.
  5. Students will work with a partner and use centimeter rods and tapes to measure each other's height, circumference and length of foot.
  6. Students will return to a discussion group and talk about their actual measurements and their estimations.
  7. Students will then make a chart with their teacher where estimations are recorded. This chart will make estimations of what they think a giant's height, circumference, and length of foot will be.
  8. Students will then break up into small groups and proceed with one of the following activities:
    1. Making a giant's foot from construction paper and discovering how many foot lengths it takes to go to various locations in the school.
    2. Making a giant using estimated measurements. Students will draw and paint their giant on a large piece of butcher paper.
    3. Writing a story about a giant.

Resources:

Evaluation: See No. 8 in Activities.

 
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