Making Mathematics Meaningful

Monday, July 16

Dave suggested that we do the "circle" thing without a major focus on the circle within a circle. In other words, each person may share, with limited suggestions from the others in the group until a printed form of each idea is available.

We also talked about the possibility of dividing our group into smaller subgroups including: intro ("hook" to interest them in exploring our site, research behind the need for learning math, our philosophy of teaching math education, mission statement), web sites, MTRN (A Math Teacher Reads the Newspaper), and a collection of lessons.

We tried to get an idea of where people would like to be:

Intro: Nate, Gina & Dori; Web Sites: Josh, Michelle, Terry & Lynette; MTRN: Dave B., Dave K. & Sue; Collection of Lessons will be an ongoing process.

We talked about our continued interaction after leaving Park City via the web. We then broke into our groups and reconvened at 2:45 p.m.

Intro: a statement of our philosophy of making math meaningful; this group came up with a "why" and a "what" related to each of the other three topics.

MTRN: looking for relationships in an article to discover some rich underlying mathematics; looking for mathematical vocabulary (dual meanings) such as the "balance"; looking for articles that would stimulate topics related to mathematics; where to find newspapers; identify questions that would bring out the mathematics.

Web Sites: abstracts of sites that will identify the math components as well as how it will appeal to students.

We decided to continue to head in this direction - all groups have more to do.

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IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute is an outreach program of the Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540
Send questions or comments to: Suzanne Alejandre and Jim King

With program support provided by Math for America

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0314808 and Grant No. ESI-0554309. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.