Math Specialists/Supervisors Summary

Monday, June 30, 2003

The morning began with breakfast with Dr. Hiebert and engaging discussions about the sampling used in the 1999 videos.

The specialists followed the High School Teacher Program schedule and they spent time in selected working groups.

The specialists attended the Cross Program Activity - Dr. Hiebert's review of the 1999 TIMSS study. Following that session, the specialists had a question and answer session with Dr. Hiebert. He showed extra slides and video clips.

Highlighted notes from the session include:
Calculators and computers were rarely used in instruction in the high achieving countries that were videotaped.
The types of problems presented to students included problems in which the students were required to state concepts, problems that require the use of procedures and problems that require students to make connections.
The average US 8th grade math class has retained its focus on developing skills.
A focus for improvement is to consider how problems are worked on - To develop conceptual underpinnings while working through mathematics problems.
The Japanese style is not used in other countries.
There are many ways to have successful instruction.
Teachers are only as effective as the methods that they use.
Achievement is the result of many factors, one of which is teaching.
It is critical that we begin to study our own teaching.

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This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0314808.
Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.