Algebra Project/Young People's Project Summary

Monday - Friday, July 2 - 6, 2012

The Algebra Project Inc. (AP) has been on the frontlines of the struggle for mathematical equity and access for the poor, African American and Latino youth. The Algebra Project, in collaboration with the Young People's Project, are organizing a National Flagway campaign. This campaign is designed to increase arithmetic and algebraic mathematical competency among underserved youth. At the heart of the campaign are the Flagway Games. These games provide students with a level of competency and expertise with basic multiplication facts and theories for the first 150 numbers as well as lay a foundation of high expectations for mathematical competency and literacy among bottom quartile students.

Amy Stoyko, Marian Currell and Monica Tienda worked together with Naama Lewis to review the Flagway Modules. The Flagway Modules are tools used to inspire and motivate young people to want to investigate numbers by playing math games, which will build on math confidence and ongoing learning. The AP/YPP group deconstructed some of the module lessons to see how an after school enrichment program could be used in the classroom. The lessons were then organized and sequenced for classroom instruction. Finally, the group worked on aligning the Flagway module lessons with the CCSSM standards and practices.

Back to Algebra Project/Young People's Project page.

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This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0314808.
Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.