Park City Mathematics Institute
Summer School Teachers Program
Summer 2014
Cross Program Activity: Mathematics to Sculpture
George Hart

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Mathematics to Sculpture

George Hart presented and discussed examples of his mathematically informed sculptures, which generally apply computer technology in their design and/or fabrication. These include works made of metal, wood, plastic, or found objects, and often use laser-cutting, plasma-cutting or 3D-printing technologies in their realization. Mathematical and computer science aspects of these designs and their underlying foundations will be discussed. A few short videos will be shown. See georgehart.com for examples and more information.

During presentation one participant heard, "Being good at math isn't about knowing all the answers. It's about what you do when you DON'T know the answers."

 

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© 2001 - 2014 Park City Mathematics Institute
IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute is an outreach program of the Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540.
Send questions or comments to: Suzanne Alejandre and Jim King

With program support provided by Math for America

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0314808 and Grant No. ESI-0554309. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.