Park City Mathematics Institute
Summer School Teachers Program
Summer 2014
Cross Program Activity: The True Story of the Quasicrystal
by Paul Hildebrandt

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An exploration of the hyperdimensional art of Clark Richert.

Clark Richert has been working with quasi-periodic tilings based on 5-fold symmetry since he and fellow artists founded the Drop City near Trinidad, Colorado in 1964. Recent paintings have explored relations among Penrose tilings and cubic lattices in 6 and 10 dimensions. His work has been exhibited throughout the country and he was recently called the "most famous artist in Colorado" by the Denver Post. He is also a Zometool co-inventor.

 

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© 2001 - 2014 Park City Mathematics Institute
IAS/Park City Mathematics Institute is an outreach program of the Institute for Advanced Study, 1 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540.
Send questions or comments to: Suzanne Alejandre and Jim King

With program support provided by Math for America

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0314808 and Grant No. ESI-0554309. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.