Author Archive for Max

Below is student work from the most recent time the Math Forum featured the “Filling Glasses” PoW. As PoW Planet teachers have their students submit to “Filling Glasses” they may choose to share some of that work with the world. We’ll link to it here. In the mean time, tell us what you notice and wonder about Max and Taylor’s work below.

Taylor, age 13

The answer to the problem is that graph 1 belongs to glass A, graph 4 belongs to glass B, and graph 3 belongs to glass C. We found this out by looking at the graphs and the glasses and seeing the pattern between the two. We did this by comparing the shape of the glass and the line in the graph. That is how we figured it out.
The answer to the problem is that graph 1 belongs to glass A, graph 4belongs to glass B, and graph 3 belongs to glass C. We found this out by looking at the graphs and the glasses and seeing the pattern between the two. We did this by comparing the shape ofthe glass and the line in the graph. That is how we figured it out.

Max, age 13

The solution is that glass A goes with graph 1, glass B goes with graph 4, and glass C goes with graph 2.

Glass A goes with graph 1 because it is narrow, then wide, then narrow.  Glass B goes with graph 4 because it is narrow then wide.  Glass C goes with graph 2 because it is wide, then narrow, then wide.

not yet tagged

Click here to see the complete PoW and assign it to your students

Not a PoW Member? Join us or register for a free Trial Account.

Match each glass with the appropriate graph of water height over time.

Glasses

PoW Planet Participants: Please share your mathematical thinking about this PoW by logging on (with your Math Forum PoW account) and creating a new post on this blog. The blog admins will publish everyone’s thoughts on Monday, August 27th as any come in, and link to them here!

not yet tagged

Here in the US, we write dates in the month/day/year format, so today, 3/14 is special because it matches the first three digits of pi.

Around the world, lots of us celebrated last fall when it was 11/11/11, because that date was the same in many different formats.

How are dates written where you live? What special math-y days are you looking forward to? Will you be celebrating Pi Day today?

not yet tagged

Sometimes, when you travel or even close to home, you see something that makes you wonder… And lots of times, math can help you learn more about the things you wonder. Here in Philadelphia there is a sculpture that honors Chinese immigrants, and that makes people who visit Philadelphia wonder.

Math teacher John Scammell came to visit Philadelphia and made a video about the sculpture.

China Wedge from John Scammell on Vimeo.

So… what do you wonder? You can leave a comment telling us what you’re wondering!

Check out what the John Ehret Patriots in New Orleans, Lousiana, USA, Noticed and Wondered about this Problem of the Week Scenario!

Here’s the story:

The Hopi Indians invented Totolospi, a game of chance. The game is played with three cane dice, a counting board, and a counter for each player. Each cane die can land round side up (r) or flat side up (f).

The moves of the game are determined by tossing the three cane dice with these rules:

Toss Move
three round sides up (rrr) player advances 2 lines
three flat sides up (fff) player advances 1 line
any other toss of the three cane dice player doesn’t advance

And here’s how they used Twitter to share what they noticed and wondered!
Read More→