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Q&A #1154

Teachers' Lounge Discussion: Front End Estimation

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From: Xun Chen <chen@dataq.com>
To: Teacher2Teacher Public Discussion
Date: 2001092421:38:28
Subject: More on Front End Estimation

Thank you for your feedback, but you didn't get to the point. 

To show an extreme case, considering $182,804,050.32 + $1, if we use
the method I shown in my first question, we will come up with a range
of $100,000,001 as the lower end, and $200000002 as the higher end.
Yes, the real number is indeed inside the ranges derived from various
approaches, but which what gives a more suitable picture of it?

My believe is if we use front-end estimation and expect it to be
useful, we should make sure the numbers are in the same order. A good
example will be like: 
	$290.94 + $146.53+ $313.83

If they are not in the same order, I suggest either zero be added to
the left side of the number, so that they appear in the same order, 

Question 13) $290.94 + $104.53 + $3.83 will become $290.94 + $104.53 +
$003.83

Thus, when we apply the current method, we will get 200+100+0 for the
lower end and 300+200+100 for the higher end for the range.

Or, more than one digit be used in this method, in our case, using two
digits will be very reasonable.

Question 13) $290.94 + $140.53 + $3.83 will have 290+140+0 for the
lower end and 300+150+10 for the higher end for the range.


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