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Q&A #4130

Teachers' Lounge Discussion: European long division

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From: Loyd <Loydlin@aol.com>
To: Teacher2Teacher Public Discussion
Date: 2001071821:22:33
Subject: Re: howdo you do your long division? What about short division? Ever heard of it?

On 28 Jun 00 07:47:49 -0400 (EDT), sue page wrote:
>Hello,
>
>      I'm interested in knowing how YOU teach long division. Ever
>heard of short division? It precedes long division. Please share your
>activity. Thanks,
>
>          Sue Page
>

See my post of 8 Jul 2001 under Division. Two web sites are given that
demostrates the long division method. 

Short division is useful when the student knows his/her multiplication
and subtraction facts and can determine remainder mentally.  Here is
an example:

Divide 6738 by 8.
    _________
 8 / 6 7 3 8         

8 goes into 67 eight times and the remainder is three.  Carry the 3 to
the right.  8 goes into 33 four times and the remainder is 1.  Carry
the remainder to the right.  8 goes into 18 Two times and the
remainder is 2.   The answer is 842 with a remainder of 2.  

It is almost the same as long division except you don't show your
subtractions and you do the math in your head.  Thus you need to know 
math facts. 
 
When I went to elementary school, short division was taught before
long division.  I think it should still be taught.  For example, if
you are trying to reduce a fraction such as 48/56 it helps you if you
can do the division in your head.  Of course, you can do that if you
know your math facts.



 



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