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Q&A #17322


Whole-Brain Learning

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From: <cokeroot_beer@yahoo.com>
To: Teacher2Teacher Service
Date: Jul 04, 2006 at 22:39:10
Subject: Whole-Brain Learning

I am Abner C. Alvarez, a
tertiary instructor from one of the universities in
the Philippines. 

Recently, we had a workshop on the whole brain
teaching/learning (WBL), of which we-- college
mathematics teachers are encouraged to use WBL in
teaching our students. 

WBL had a very good impression for teachers in the
areas of english, science, history, religious
studies,and the like. But a great majority of the math
professors find it hard to implement WBL in their
respective classes for the following reasons:

1. It is time consuming. We may adopt WBL but we are
afraid that we cannot cover the topics in our course
outline.
2. Teachers are not ready, as well as students.
Teachers were not given sample instructional materials
or modules in math using WBL. 
3. We find it inappropriate for higher mathematics.
When we prove theorems, we might not be able to use
experiential learning - one of the learning theories
in WBL.

It has been our observation that most of the TOP
UNIVERSITIES in our country use the lecture method,
cooperative learning, and integrate technology -- but
these may not necessarily be WBL.

Would you mind if i ask for your expertise on this
matter? Maybe we can ask from you sample modules or
materials using WBL for our guide. 

Thank you very much! (Muchas gracias!)

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