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Q&A #19191


Place value

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From: Gail (for Teacher2Teacher Service)
Date: Dec 28, 2007 at 20:32:56
Subject: Re: Place value

Hi Eileen,  

I don't know of a source for buying base 7 blocks, but I was thinking that it
probably wouldn't be so very hard to create some yourself. The units could be
chips or counters. The next level could be little cups, and the level after
that small plates. It would take 7 chips to make a cup, and 7 cups (or 49
chips) to make a plate. If you needed to go another step, you could use a bowl.

Another thought is just to use the four color poker chips. Make each chip 
worth one of the levels. This is just like a game called chip trading, 
where you determine how much each color of chip is worth, and then race up 
to the largest chip, rolling a die and adding to what you have.

For example, if the red chip is worth one (7^0), the blue chip could be 
worth 7(7^1), and the white chip worth 49 (7^2), with the last chip, the 
black one, worth 343(7^3). (I am not sure of the colors of poker chips, 
but you get the idea, I hope.  So, you roll the die, and it says "5". You 
get to take 5 of the red chips. On your next turn, you roll a "6". Now 
you get to take 6 more red chips, and you can trade in 7 of the chips for a 
blue chip. Eventually you will have enough to trade for a white, and then 
a black chip.

I think, since you are using such a large final number, you may want to use 
two dice. This game is usually played with base 4, I believe.

 -Gail, for the T2T service

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