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Q&A #6201


Tessellation shapes

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From: Suzanne A. (for Teacher2Teacher Service)
Date: Apr 25, 2001 at 16:00:45
Subject: Re: Tessellations shapes

Dear Anna, I'm sorry that my explanation and suggestion of a Website was not helpful. I will try again and this time I'll try answering each of your questions. >I was wondering what kinds of shapes make up a tesselations? There are different kinds of tessellations. "Regular" tessellations can be made using triangles, squares or hexagons. >Like I know >that you can make tesselations from triangles, I always wondering about >squares? Do squares make tesselations? Yes, you can make a tessellation from squares. >Do hexagons? Yes, you can make a tessellation from hexagons. >What kinds of shapes would make up a tesselations? Think about fitting 4 squares together and think about the corners that all touch in the middle of that new shape. _|_ | It's rather difficult to "show" in email but that is kind of what I am trying to explain. Can you see that the 4 angles coming together each equal 90 degrees but together equal 360 degrees? That is one thing that helps you determine whether shapes will tessellate or not. Every Website that I know of on tessellations is listed on my Tessellation Tutorials page: Tessellation Tutorials http://mathforum.org/sum95/suzanne/tess.intro.html under the title: Other Tessellation Links and Related Sites but I would still recommend that you read this page, "What Is a Tessellation?" and look at the diagrams to understand how polygons tessellate: http://mathforum.org/sum95/suzanne/whattess.html -Suzanne A., for the T2T service

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