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Q&A #7226


Geoboard activities

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From: Roya (for Teacher2Teacher Service)
Date: Nov 12, 2001 at 22:01:24
Subject: Re: Geoboard activities

Dear Gail,

In addition to the suggestions by Jeanne, I have a few more:

** The following worksheets help your students discover Pick's Theorem on 
their own.  Encourage your students to work through them and move onto the 
section with pictures containing holes: 

http://intranet.cps.k12.il.us/Lessons/StructuredCurriculumTOC/SCMathematics/G
rade_5_Mathematics_Daily_Less/SCMA5G1/MA5G080090.PDF

You need to have Adobe® Acrobat® Reader® software on your computer to open 
the above link.  If you don't have it, download a free copy of the Reader 
from here first:

http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep.html

** Have you seen the Pick's applet by Alex Bogomolny?

http://www.cut-the-knot.com/ctk/Pick.html

** I found two "Problems of the Week" dealing with Pick's Theorem:

Graphing for Area 
http://mathforum.org/midpow/solutions/solution.ehtml?puzzle=73

Exploring Area 
http://mathforum.org/midpow/solutions/solution.ehtml?puzzle=76


Gail, you might end your lesson by challenging your students to think about 
Pick's Theorem in 3 dimensions. Does it (or a variation) hold for volume of 
3 dimensional object? How about volume of the 3-dimensional shapes with 
holes? This makes a great topic for a math project.

Good luck.  Keep in touch and let us know how it goes.

 -Roya Salehi, for the T2T service

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