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Topic: Problem Solving
Replies: 5   Last Post: Feb 25, 1995 2:33 PM

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roitman@oberon.math.ukans.edu

Posts: 243
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Problem Solving
Posted: Feb 24, 1995 10:06 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

>I haven't really started a discussion yet so I thought I would through
>something out and see what happens. The question is do you use problem
>solving in your teaching? If yes, how? If no, why not? Then maybe if
>someone wants to look at the standards to see what they suggest that would
>be good too. Responces?
>scott
>
>Scott Powell
>University Lab School
>1776 University Ave.
>Honolulu, HI 96826
>(808)956-4987wk
>dpowell@math.ed.hawaii.edu



Another question is the following: do you isolate problem-solving or
integrate it with everything else? If the former, why, and if the latter,
how?

I'm also very interested in whether or how K-12 teachers use the various
problem-solving descriptors (e.g. "guess and check"). Let me be very
upfront about this and say that as a practicing mathematician I am very
suspicious of these check-lists, since they seem (a) vague, (b) susceptible
of being turned into an algorithm, and (c) have little to do with what
really happens when we solve mathematical problems.

Having thrown down the gauntlet I'll sit back and listen to the responses.

Cheers.


====================================
Judy Roitman, Mathematics Department
Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66049
roitman@math.ukans.edu
=====================================











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