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Topic: Chapter 3--Everybody Counts
Replies: 11   Last Post: Mar 18, 1995 1:02 AM

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Andre TOOM

Posts: 549
Registered: 12/3/04
Re: Chapter 3--Everybody Counts
Posted: Mar 14, 1995 8:54 PM
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On Tue, 14 Mar 1995, Ronald A Ward wrote:

> 1. What really is "mathematical power" and how do your students get it?
> [The definition given in this reform document differs markedly from
> those given in the various Standards documents, in my opinion]


The `mathematical power' is proficiency in building formal
models, relating them to other experience and manipulating them.

> 2. In what sense is mathematics our "invisible culture"?

Mathematics is part of culture. The adjective `invisible'
does not make sense here.

> 3. Comment on the statement: "As computers become more powerful, the
> need for mathematics will decline."


This is too silly to comment.

> 4. Why is it that mathematics education in the United States resists
> change in spite of the many forces that are revolutionizing the nature
> and role of mathematics itself?


Well, everything resists changes. The right question is `Why do
Americans tolerate so bad education ?' Because it is a privilege
in the modern world to be an American. An American does not need
to be competent. He is an American, and that is it.

> 5. Why do you suppose that 50% of school teachers leave the profession
> every seven years?


What about other professions ? I need data about them to compare.

Andrei Toom








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