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Topic: Geometry Question #3
Replies: 39   Last Post: Jun 18, 2009 5:05 PM

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Tennantij@aol.com

Posts: 217
Registered: 12/3/04
Re: Geometry Question #3
Posted: Jun 17, 2009 9:15 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply
att1.html (9.6 K)

they are 8th grade PI's and are always on the 8th grade state test.
Iva Jean Tennant


In a message dated 6/17/2009 8:10:30 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
elizwaite@aol.com writes:

I would hope that everyone taught a dilation of -1. It's a fairly common
thing to show in high school (and I would think in middle school...aren't
transformations in the 8th grade pi's and possibly 6th grade?). I would
say if someone out there is NOT teaching this, please show it! It certainly
will lead to an interesting discussion in your classroom, won't it?
Liz Waite


-----Original Message-----
From: Virginia Kuryla <VKuryla2@williamsoncentral.org>
To: nyshsmath@mathforum.org
Sent: Wed, Jun 17, 2009 1:58 pm
Subject: Re: Geometry Question #3


Ok, help me out here. And please forgive my ignorance...
I'm trying to follow your discussion. I have not seen the test yet. I
work in
a middle school but am intrigued by your discussion. Question #3 would be
a
multiple choice question right? From the thread I get the idea it was
something
like "identify the transformation shown below" and the picture was one
that was
a rotation of 180 degrees.

Though I personally have never heard of a Dilation of -1, for the moment
I'm
willing to accept that this is possible. I'm curious how many of you
actually
taught that to your students. If you didn't teach it that way then I have
a
feeling that we are getting more worked up than the kids. It seems
unlikely that
many students would have come across Dilation of -1 on their own.
Unfortunately
we have no way of knowing what a student was thinking when they chose
their
answer since it was multiple choice. On the other hand if Dilation of -1
is
accepted math notation and it was taught that way, I think that those
districts
who had lots of students interpret it that way should contact state ed.

I'm wondering if the person who initiated this thread would share if this
was a
concern that a student brought to them or a concern that they had on their
own.
And what percentage of the students who answered incorrectly chose
dilation.

Ginny Kuryla



>>> "George Reuter" <_Reuterg@canandaiguaschools.org_
(mailto:Reuterg@canandaiguaschools.org) > 6/17/2009 10:34 AM >>>
Dolores,

With respect, regentsprep.org isn't the only source of mathematically
valid
information. I could quote various sources (mathworld.com,
icoachmath.com,
etc.) that would say that a dilation could have a factor of 1 or -1 (even
though
we recognize these would be trivial dilations).

I do, however, agree that there's a lot of guesswork a student had to do
to
answer the question, and that the guesswork that would have led to
"rotation"
(realizing that ABC is congruent to A'B'C') could just as easily led that
student to "dilation" (although the savvy student probably picked rotation
because it was choice 1).

George Reuter
Canandaigua Academy

>>> "Storey, Dolores" <_DStorey@newlebanoncsd.org_
(mailto:DStorey@newlebanoncsd.org) > 6/17/2009 9:32 AM >>>
Here is the information from regentsprep.org


Dilations
Topic Index | Geometry Index | Regents Exam Prep Center



A dilation is a transformation (notation ) that produces an image that
is the
same shape as the original, but is a different size. A dilation
stretches or
shrinks the original figure.

The description of a dilation includes the scale factor (or ratio) and the
center of the dilation. The center of dilation is a fixed point in the
plane
about which all points are expanded or contracted. It is the only
invariant
point under a dilation.



A dilation of scalar factor k whose center of dilation is the origin
may be written: Dk (x, y) = (kx, ky).
If the scale factor, k, is greater than 1, the image is an enlargement (a
stretch).
If the scale factor is between 0 and 1, the image is a reduction (a
shrink).
(If the scale factor should be less than 0, a dilation has occurred as
well as a
reflection in the center.)

Properties preserved (invariant) under a dilation:
1. angle measures (remain the same)
2. parallelism (parallel lines remain parallel)
3. colinearity (points stay on the same lines)
4. midpoint (midpoints remain the same in each figure)
5. orientation (lettering order remains the same)
- ---------------------------------------------------------------
6. distance is NOT preserved (NOT an isometry)
(lengths of segments are NOT the same)
Dilations create similar figures.


Definition: A dilation is a transformation of the plane, , such that if O
is a
fixed point, k is a non-zero real number, and P' is the image of point P,
then
O, P and P' are collinear and .
Notation:

Examples:1.


P' is the image of P under a
dilation about O of ratio 2.
OP' = 2OP and

2.
is the image of under a dilation about O of ratio .










Most dilations in coordinate geometry use the origin, (0,0), as the center
of
the dilation.

Example 1:

PROBLEM: Draw the dilation image of triangle ABC with the center of
dilation
at the origin and a scale factor of 2.
OBSERVE: Notice how EVERY coordinate of the original triangle has been
multiplied by the scale factor (x2).

HINT: Dilations involve multiplication!







Example 2:

PROBLEM: Draw the dilation image of pentagon ABCDE with the center of
dilation
at the origin and a scale factor of 1/3.
OBSERVE: Notice how EVERY coordinate of the original pentagon has been
multiplied by the scale factor (1/3).

HINT: Multiplying by 1/3 is the same as dividing by 3!





For this example, the center of the dilation is NOT the origin. The
center of
dilation is a vertex of the original figure.

Example 3:

PROBLEM: Draw the dilation image of rectangle EFGH with the center of
dilation
at point E and a scale factor of 1/2.
OBSERVE: Point E and its image are the same. It is important to observe
the
distance from the center of the dilation, E, to the other points of the
figure.
Notice EF = 6 and E'F' = 3.

HINT: Be sure to measure distances for this problem.









-
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Topic Index | Geometry Index | Regents Exam Prep Center
Created by Donna Roberts
Copyright 1998-2009 _http://regentsprep.org_ (http://regentsprep.org/) (
_http://regentsprep.org/_ (http://regentsprep.org/) )
Oswego City School District Regents Exam Prep Center

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Date Subject Author
6/16/09
Read Geometry Question #3
edward mertson
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Jonathan Halabi
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
Roberta Silver
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
reuterg@canandaiguaschools.org
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
edward mertson
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
reuterg@canandaiguaschools.org
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
edward mertson
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
BHowitt@wlsv.org
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
Tom Kenyon
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Storey, Dolores
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
Roberta Silver
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Storey, Dolores
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
reuterg@canandaiguaschools.org
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Virginia Kuryla
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
PJ Manzo
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
cindy@wcs
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
kgilbert@twcny.rr.com
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
cindy@wcs
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
ElizWaite@aol.com
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Jonathan Halabi
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
Roberta Silver
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Storey, Dolores
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Tom Kenyon
6/17/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
Kathy
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Tennantij@aol.com
6/17/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
MathCaryl@aol.com
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
ELEANOREVO@aol.com
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Sharon
6/18/09
Read RE: Geometry Question #3
Eleanor Pupko
6/18/09
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Jonathan Halabi
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Sharon
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
djud@optonline.net
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Tennantij@aol.com
6/18/09
Read non-regents geometry textbook
Brent Neeley
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Tennantij@aol.com
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Sharon
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Jonathan Halabi
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
Sharon
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
StGOLD2112@aol.com
6/18/09
Read Re: Geometry Question #3
MathCaryl@aol.com

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