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Topic: Mathematics as a language
Replies: 35   Last Post: Nov 8, 2010 1:53 AM

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lwalke3@lausd.net

Posts: 2,394
Registered: 8/3/07
Re: Mathematics as a language
Posted: Nov 7, 2010 10:57 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

On Nov 6, 6:00 pm, Brian Chandler <imaginator...@despammed.com> wrote:
> Daryl McCullough wrote:
> > I don't think that's right at all. It doesn't have anything
> > to do with 6 being special.

> Never mind about being special, I'm completely baffled by the concept
> of the "object" [!?] 6. What on earth does it mean for it to "exist"?
> It seems to me that 6 only exists in the (incontrovertible) sense that
> the Judaeo-Christian God "exists"


Ha! The religious analogy strikes again!

> people have been engaged in talking
> about him, teaching this stuff to their children, and look! he has a
> Wikipedia entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God. Anyway, for
> balance, there's this too: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6_%28number%29


Exactly! Of course, most people in the world believe in the existence
of the
number six -- even more than believe in the Judaeo-Christian God --
but
people are more divided on the existence of certain natural numbers
that
are much, much larger than six. Try 10^600 -- there are active threads
at
sci.math that question the existence of numbers larger than 10^600.
And
those who believe in the existence of said large numbers in those
threads
are called "religious" by those who don't believe in them, just as
those who
worship the Judaeo-Christian God are judged for their religion by
those who
aren't Jewish or Christian.

So I agree wholeheartedly with Chandler here!


Date Subject Author
11/2/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Aatu Koskensilta
11/3/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/3/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Herman Jurjus
11/3/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Marshall
11/3/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Herman Jurjus
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Marshall
11/5/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/5/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Herman Jurjus
11/6/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/6/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
James Dolan
11/6/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Tim Little
11/6/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Daryl McCullough
11/6/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Marshall
11/6/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Brian Chandler
11/6/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Tim Little
11/7/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
lwalke3@lausd.net
11/8/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Brian Chandler
11/7/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/7/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Daryl McCullough
11/8/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/3/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
lwalke3@lausd.net
11/3/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Marshall
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/3/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Daryl McCullough
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Bill Taylor
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Daryl McCullough
11/5/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Daryl McCullough
11/5/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
herb z
11/5/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
Daryl McCullough
11/4/10
Read Re: Mathematics as a language
VK

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