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Topic: Computing rotation matrix from one vector
Replies: 7   Last Post: Oct 28, 2011 2:50 PM

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Carlos Junior

Posts: 14
Registered: 3/9/10
Re: Computing rotation matrix from one vector
Posted: Mar 29, 2011 1:05 AM
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Hi Rune, very thanks by the answer, but, the Wikipedia link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler's_rotation_theorem does not elucidate the doubt... There are a lot of text and theory there, but, not a numeric or practical example of the type I have shown before ( [ 0.245 -0.563 -0.055 ]' = R * [ 0.3 -0.5 0.2 ]' ) ...

Please, how would you find the R matrix of this problem? The information above is enough to find that ?

Very Thanks,

Carlos Junior
carlosjunior@gmail.com



Rune Allnor <allnor@tele.ntnu.no> wrote in message <62228b51-0fe2-43bd-a76b-0d9f0266619f@z20g2000yqe.googlegroups.com>...
> On Mar 29, 6:28 am, "Carlos Junior" <carlosjun...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Hi, please, I would like to ask a help about finding a Rotation Matrix.
> >
> > Doubt: Is it possible to get the Rotation Matrix of one vector at the System of Coordinates #1 to the System of Coordinates #2 ?
> >
> > The transformation is below:
> > [ 0.245 -0.563 -0.055 ]' = R * [ 0.3 -0.5 0.2 ]'
> >
> > I think it is possible because the setup above give me 3 equations and 3 variables (theta_x, theta_y, theta_z)... But, MatLab can not solve!
> >
> > Thanks a lot
> >
> > Carlos
> > carlosjun...@gmail.com

>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler's_rotation_theorem
>
> Rune




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