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Topic: Matheology S 162
Replies: 3   Last Post: Nov 29, 2012 3:26 PM

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Jesse F. Hughes

Posts: 9,776
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Matheology S 162
Posted: Nov 28, 2012 1:46 PM
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Pardon my lack of willpower. I once again feel compelled to point out
that WM is a moron. It will do no good, I know.

WM <mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de> writes:

> On 28 Nov., 16:13, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Nov 28, 10:59 am, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
>>

>> > On 28 Nov., 13:48, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> > > On Nov 28, 2:43 am, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
>>
>> > > > Induction proves also: Every set of natural numbers is finite.
>> > > > Why do you overlook this simple proof?

>>
>> > > No, what induction proves is that every set of natural numbers
>> > > with a largest number is finite.

>>
>> > And induction proves that every set of natural numbers has a largest
>> > number. For every finite n also n + 1 is finite

>>
>> Look! Over There! A Pink Elephant!
>>

>> >and the set containing
>> > both, n and n + 1 ist finite too.

>>
>> There is of course no such thing as
>>  "the set containing both n and n+1".

>
> Here it is: {n, n+1}


So, your conclusion is that, for every n, the set {n,n+1} is finite?

If so, surely we agree. And from this, we infer that every set of
natural numbers is finite, er, how?

Fill in the gaps here:

For every n, the set {n, n+1} is finite.

.

.

.

Therefore, every set of natural numbers is finite.

--
"Being in the ring of algebraic integers is just kind of being in a
weird place, but it's no different than if you are in an Elk's Lodge
with weird made up rules versus just being out in regular society."
-- James S. Harris, teacher



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