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Topic: On the Mayan Ethno-mathematics of Divination:Debunking the Astronomical Dec
Replies: 5   Last Post: Dec 4, 2012 5:39 PM

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Hossam Aboulfotouh

Posts: 161
From: Egypt
Registered: 7/20/07
Re: On the Mayan Ethno-mathematics of Divination:Debunking the Astronomical Dec
Posted: Nov 29, 2012 5:56 AM
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Milo,

You reply without reading the paper via the given link.
http://www.benfotouh.com/pdf/HMK-Aboulfotouh-Mayan-Ethnomathematics-of-Divination.pdf

The paper shows that the idea of multiplying any numeral column in the Mayan Codices or in the tables that were found 6 months ago in Xultun Guatemala, by the factors 20, 360, 7200, 144000, etc., is incorrect and misleading and do not give any date, Why? Because these tables are only for divination practices, based on using two sets of numbers. i.e., form 1-20 and from 1 to 13. That is I debunking the claims that say "there are Mayan astronomical tables". And this idea of the long count is thus factatious.

Its abstract is here below:

"Saturno et al. (Reports, Science Vol. 336, p714-717) claim that the numeric tables found on the inner walls of a small masonry-vaulted structure in the extensive Mayan ruins of Xultun, Guatemala record the movement of the moon, and perhaps Mars and Venus, and tables in Dresden Codex are of the likeness. Here I show that those types of Mayan tables record mere divination readings and do not include nor imply any astronomical records"


Hossam M. K. Aboulfotouh



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