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Topic: TIME TO REFUTE THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS
Replies: 4   Last Post: Dec 25, 2012 6:57 AM

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Pentcho Valev

Posts: 3,528
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: TIME TO REFUTE THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS
Posted: Dec 25, 2012 4:18 AM
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Maxwell introduced his "demon" in 1867 in a letter to Tait:

http://www.informationphilosopher.com/solutions/scientists/maxwell/
"...the hot system has got hotter and the cold colder and yet no work has been done, only the intelligence of a very observant and neat-fingered being has been employed."

Clearly, Maxwell's thesis amounts to the following:

In the presence of "a very observant and neat-fingered being", the second law of thermodynamics CAN be violated.

Now consider Kelvin's (original) version of the second law:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_law_of_thermodynamics
"It is impossible, by means of inanimate material agency, to derive mechanical effect from any portion of matter by cooling it below the temperature of the coldest of the surrounding objects."

Kelvin's statement does not entail that the presence of an ANIMATE agency would drastically change the situation but still, by analogy with the Maxwell demon's case, one could advance the following hypothesis:

In the presence of an animate agency (e.g. an ordinary human being) the second law CAN be violated.

I am going to prove this hypothesis in a paper entitled "Maxwell's demons all over the place".

Pentcho Valev



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