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Topic: Chapt15.41 deriving thermodynamics out of the Malus law of the
Maxwell Equations #1183 New Physics #1303 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

Replies: 1   Last Post: Jan 28, 2013 3:50 PM

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bacle

Posts: 838
From: nyc
Registered: 6/6/10
Re: Hey, Asshole.....
Posted: Jan 28, 2013 3:50 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

> I am not finished with superconductivity chapter for
> I have a lot of
> comments, historical lessons, and more issues to
> discuss. But I want
> to start on how the Malus law derived from the
> Maxwell Equations
> encompasses two of the four laws of Thermodynamics
> and makes
> Thermodynamics a subset of the Maxwell Equations.


Good, post them on your OWN FUCKING WEBSITE AND STOP

WITH YOUR OFF-TOPIC POSTING IN SCI.MATH.

>
> It is lucky for me that thermodynamics has 4 laws
> that are short and
> concise:
> 1) Zeroth law: law of equal temperatures
> 2) 1st law: conservation of energy
> 3) 2nd law: heat flows from hot body to cold body,
> never the reverse
> 4) 3rd law: impossible to reach absolute zero Kelvin
>
> Now I wish to show that the Malus law of the Maxwell
> Equations begets
> the 2nd law and 3rd law of thermodynamics.
>
> Now let me make a side note here. In that I thought
> the Maxwell
> Equations had to have temperature as a term inside
> the Maxwell
> Equations themselves. It is obvious that heat affects
> magnetism and so
> I thought there had to be temperature terms involved
> in the Maxwell
> Equations.
> But the Maxwell Equations do not need temperature
> terms.
>
> But what rescued me from superconductivity theory was
> that the Malus
> law does have temperature and heat and resistance
> involved, although
> to our untrained eyes and minds, we would not
> recognize it at first
> glance. You see, the Malus law makes Intensity of
> photons to be
> temperature, and to be heat and to be resistance. So
> the Malus law
> tells us there is an Absolute Zero Kelvin temperature
> and it is when
> the polarized filters are 0 degrees, or aligned and
> where all the
> photons flow through. And there is a maximum hot
> temperature of 90
> degrees (we probably need a 5th law of thermodynamics
> of a maximum
> temperature), where there is no flow of photons for
> they are all
> transformed into heat. And the angles in between 0
> and 90 degrees is
> the flow of hot to cold because a fraction of the
> initial photon
> intensity gets through. The photons are "hot" and
> when they flow
> through they are transported to a "cold".
>
> Let me lament something here, that in the early 1990s
> I constructed a
> theory of superconductivity based on the idea that
> the neutrinos were
> the messenger particles, and here in 2013, I have
> basically the same
> theory, only I use photons, not neutrinos. In the
> 1990s, I did not
> have the Maxwell Equations as the axioms over all of
> physics and in
> the 1990s, I was not aware of the huge role of the
> Malus law.
>
> But I still feel that neutrinos are part of this
> picture of
> superconductivity and also thermodynamics.
>
> --
>
> Google's archives are top-heavy in hate-spew from
> search-engine-
> bombing. Only Drexel's Math Forum has done a
> excellent, simple and
> fair archiving of AP posts for the past 15 years as
> seen here:
>
> http://mathforum.org/kb/profile.jspa?userID=499986
>
> Archimedes Plutonium
> http://www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
> whole entire Universe is just one big atom
> where dots of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies




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