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Topic: THE -[UNBELIEVABLE]- STATE OF MATHEMATICS TODAY!
Replies: 7   Last Post: Mar 1, 2013 3:34 PM

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Graham Cooper

Posts: 4,321
Registered: 5/20/10
Re: THE -[UNBELIEVABLE]- STATE OF MATHEMATICS TODAY!
Posted: Mar 1, 2013 3:34 PM
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On Mar 1, 8:07 pm, David Bernier <david...@videotron.ca> wrote:
> On 03/01/2013 03:00 AM, Graham Cooper wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

> > Give the below Information:
>
> > LIST X
> > 0.00....
> > 0.00....
> > ....

>
> > 99 OUT OF 100 SCI.MATH POSTERS
>
> > WILL SWEAR TILL BLUE IN THE FACE
>
> > THEY
> >    KNOW
> >       WITH
> >         ABSOLUTE
> >            CERTAINTY

>
> [...]
>
> How many points are there in a 1 lb. block of cheese?
> ======================================================
> ======================================================
>
> If countable number, remove 1 cubic millimeter around 1st point,
> 0.1 cubic millimeter around 2nd point, then 0.01
> cubic millimeter around 3rd point, ad infinitum ...
>
> Total removed is (at most) :
> 1 + 0.1 + 0.01 + 0.001 + ... cubic millimeters
> = 1.11111111111111111111... cubic millimeters .
>
> So if block of cheese is 1 lb, or 454 cc,
> 454,000 -2 = 453,998 cubic milimeters  remain after removing
> at most 1.11111111111111111111111... (or 2 mm^3) cubic millimeters,
> ... but no cheese points remain ...
>
> Now, how is that possible?
>
> dave


Not with this!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fundamental_theorem_of_calculus


Herc
--
www.BLoCKPROLOG.com



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