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Topic: Simple analytical properties of n/d
Replies: 20   Last Post: Mar 11, 2013 11:01 PM

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ross.finlayson@gmail.com

Posts: 1,220
Registered: 2/15/09
Re: Simple analytical properties of n/d
Posted: Mar 10, 2013 2:10 PM
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On Mar 10, 10:35 am, FredJeffries <fredjeffr...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Mar 3, 3:38 pm, "Ross A. Finlayson" <ross.finlay...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> There's someone trying to steal your ideas:http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/5527/
>
> I think you ought to sue.



Not having read the paper, as soon as it says "hyper-reals" in the
description then we are talking about somewhat different things (if of
the same matters, that constant monotone EF is structurally the CDF of
N regularly/uniformly, here ran(f) instead of hyperreals).
http://mathforum.org/kb/thread.jspa?forumID=13&threadID=2421715&messageID=7941700#7941700

http://philpapers.org/rec/GWIINA

With regards to "Infinite numbers are large finite numbers", haven't
read beyond the abstract, but I wonder if it's a finitist view. (And
I wonder that regular/well-founded "infinities" are a finitist view.)
Then, a casual inspection of some available writings sees that he
actually means "infinite regular/well-founded transfinite ordinals are
only large finite numbers".

Yaroslav Sergeyev is also noted as writing in a similar vein, Yaroslav
writes of the infinity as scalar with "Gross 1", for arithmetic with
infinite ordinals that extends the arithmetic of infinite ordinals of
set theory.

Regards,

Ross Finlayson



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