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Topic: Chapt3 Math-Statistics proving method #117 book Metal Causation Diseases
Replies: 2   Last Post: Mar 24, 2013 12:44 AM

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plutonium.archimedes@gmail.com

Posts: 9,551
Registered: 3/31/08
more on cadmium Re: Chapt3 Math-Statistics proving method #119 book
Metal Causation Diseases

Posted: Mar 24, 2013 12:44 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

On Mar 23, 3:20 pm, Archimedes Plutonium
<plutonium.archime...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Mar 23, 1:57 am, Archimedes Plutonium
(snipped)
>
> Mercury is perhaps the single most dangerous non radioactive toxin on
> Earth, yet, we humans as a society continue to fill our houses, homes,


Sorry, mercury is probably not the most dangerous non-radioactive
element
but it is certainly dangerous.

And, I am learning about cadmium and it appears to be similar to
mercury, although not as toxic.
Cd even forms mercuric cadmium compounds.

I was reading where cadmium is taken into the body via smoking of
cigarettes. So like mercury, cadmium
is commonly found in human bodies.

Cadmium is often found in batteries and when they are thrown in trash
landfills they likely leak out and
get into the water supply.

--

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Archimedes Plutonium
http://www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
whole entire Universe is just one big atom
where dots of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies




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