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Topic: Matheology § 231
Replies: 9   Last Post: Mar 25, 2013 5:42 PM

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fom

Posts: 1,968
Registered: 12/4/12
Re: Matheology § 231
Posted: Mar 25, 2013 1:54 PM
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On 3/25/2013 7:24 AM, WM wrote:
> Matheology § 231
>
>
>
> One philosophically important way in which numbers and sets, as they
> are naively understood, differ is that numbers are physically
> instantiated in a way that sets are not. Five apples are an instance
> of the number 5 and a pair of shoes is an instance of the number 2,
> but there is nothing obvious that we can analogously point to as an
> instance of, say, the set {{/0}}.
> [Nik Weaver: "Is set theory indispensable?"]
> http://www.math.wustl.edu/~nweaver/indisp.pdf
>
> Regards, WM
>


Once again, here is a link to an article discussing
the Aspect experiments.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/media/pdf/197911_0158.pdf

Perhaps WM would care to explain "physically instantiated" in
respect to the conclusion of that paper:

"Most particles or aggregates of particles that
are ordinarily regarded as separate objects have
interacted at some time in the past with other
objects. The violation of separability seems to
imply that in some sense all these objects
constitute an indivisible whole. Perhaps in such
a world the concept of an independent existing
reality can retain some meaning, but it will be
an altered meaning and one remote from everyday
experience."













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