Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » sci.math.* » sci.math.independent

Topic: Find the perfect square closest to n(x), i just want the perfect square above or below no decimals. Can it be solved using geometry?
Replies: 7   Last Post: Nov 1, 2013 8:53 PM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
JT

Posts: 1,150
Registered: 4/7/12
Re: Find the perfect square closest to n(x), i just want the perfect
square above or below no decimals. Can it be solved using geometry?

Posted: Nov 1, 2013 10:03 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

Den fredagen den 1:e november 2013 kl. 04:01:53 UTC+1 skrev Ben Bacarisse:
> jonas.thornvall@gmail.com writes:
>
> <snip>
>

> > Actually Ben i have a similar that may be easier for you to follow,
>
> > any square can be divided into 4 sub squares. And if we have a number
>
> > we can find the 10^x above it and 10^x-1 below it.
>


>
> > So 10^x is 1 now we can chose if we want 0 at real zero or zero at
>
> > square 10^x-1 If we choose the later we close in faster. Now the area
>
> > between the lesser and bigger square or if we use zero, can be
>
> > described as a percentage ratio of the height.
>
>
> Sorry, I can't make head nor tail of this.
>

I find it hard to beleive that a skille mathematician can not understand this principle.
HERE ENDS BIG SQUARE BETWEEN SMALL BIG IS RANGE
Sqrt=Height=number*1,0 (10*10)/100=1.0 of area
Sqrt=Height=number*0,9 (9*9)/100=0.81 of area
Sqrt=Height=number*0,8 (8*8)/100=0.64 ...
Sqrt=Height=number*0,7 (7*7)/100=0.49 ...
Sqrt=Height=number*0,6 (6*6)/100=0.36 ...
Sqrt=Height=number*0,5 (5*5)/100=0.25 ...
Sqrt=Height=number*0,4 (4*4)/100=0.16 ...
Sqrt=Height=number*0,3 (3*3)/100=0.09 ...
Sqrt=Height=number*0,2 (2*2)/100=0.04 ...
Sqrt=Height=number*0,1 (1*1)/100=0.01 ...
HERE START SMALL SQUARE BETWEEN SMALL AND BIG IS RANGE
>
> <snip>
>

> > The perfect square we find is subtracted from our number and now we
>
> > work same approach for this smaller square. This is repeated until the
>
> > full number is encoded to a series of squares + a small integer less
>
> > then 4.
>
>
>
> Yes, this bit I've understood, but why? What's the point of doing this?
>
>
>
> <snip>
>
> --
>
> Ben.




Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.