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Topic: Why Make Reform So Complicated?
Replies: 5   Last Post: Jan 22, 2014 11:42 AM

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Domenico Rosa

Posts: 2,081
Registered: 2/16/05
Re: Why Make Reform So Complicated?
Posted: Jan 22, 2014 11:42 AM
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> ********************************
> From Education Week [American Education's Newspaper
> r of Record],
> Wednesday, January 15, 2014, Volume 33, Issue 17,
> pages 22,28. See
> http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2014/01/15/17schmoke
> r_ep.h33.html?tkn=NXYF8poZx3xMHdESotFbHo0myIAyrpdrYEtN
> &cmp=ENL-EU-NEWS2
> ********************************
> COMMENTARY
>
> Why Make Reform So Complicated?
>
> By Mike Schmoker
>
> In the realm of organizational improvement,
> complexity kills. [snip]
>
> Education clearly doesn't get this. Perhaps no
> enterprise is more crippled by complexity than
> school improvement.


It really boils down to money. Complexity generates more money for those who control the education business in the U.S. These hucksters are profiting from a situation analogous to that of the architect who designed the stadium for the 1976 Olympics in Montreal. He negotiated a contract whereby his payment was based on the total
cost. Thus, the more blunders he made, the more money he received.

There is absolutely no incentive for simplification such as producing textbooks like the ones proposed in the 7/20/2012 Report "K-8 Publishers' Criteria for the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics," which is available at:

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Math_Publishers_Criteria_K-8_Summer%202012_FINAL.pdf

The following is on Page 19:

"(For paper-based materials.) A textbook that is focused is short. For example, by design Japanese textbooks have less than one page per lesson. Elementary textbooks should be less than 200 pages, middle and secondary less than 500 pages."



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