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Topic: Re: How science shaped modern 'rejection of religion'
Replies: 1   Last Post: Mar 28, 2014 11:05 AM

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kirby urner

Posts: 1,908
Registered: 11/29/05
Re: How science shaped modern 'rejection of religion'
Posted: Mar 28, 2014 11:05 AM
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On Fri, Mar 28, 2014 at 7:03 AM, GS Chandy <gs_chandy@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Kirby Urner posted Mar 27, 2014 11:36 PM (
> http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9420774) - GSC's remarks
> interspersed. I may have responded elsewhere to some issues raised in this
> post of yours, but I do believe I see some further remarks I should make to
> get my view across (to the extent I am able to in 'pure prose'):

> >
> > On Thu, Mar 27, 2014 at 8:53 AM, GS Chandy
> > <gs_chandy@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >

> > > Kirby Urner posted Mar 27, 2014 8:11 PM (
> > >

> > http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9420632
> > ):

> > > >
> > > <Quote of GSC's post snipped>
> > > >
> > > > I think there's this rush to decide that a
> > > > religious praxis has to do with
> > > > "explaining" or "giving answers".
> > > >

> > > One could have no objections whatsoever to a
> > > 'religious praxis' providing
> > > comfort to those who desire it. The only objection
> > > to religion/ religious
> > > praxis could be when such praxis attempts to assume
> > > power over what people
> > > wish to think, pronouncing the free expression of
> > > ideas to be 'blasphemous'
> > > and etc. This has often happened in the past. I
> > > would object if the
> > > 'a-religious' were to behave this way.
> > >

> >
> > "Giving comfort" is too lame a role to assign to
> > religion, keeping all the
> > other adult stuff for political parties, labor
> > unions, lobbyists of all
> > stripes.
> >

> True. I agree, largely (though not entirely, I believe).
>


I'm just saying religions do lot more than give comfort. Quakers have a
lobby office in DC for example. Religions lobby.



> You may like to read Amartya Sen's "The Argumentative Indian".
> Fascinating thesis. It's VERY well argued; though I personally do NOT
> agree with much of his argument: I believe that our 'Indian
> argumentativeness' (which he ascribes to us as a 'people') is, in fact,
> shallow ('profoundly shallow', if I may use an oxymoron).
>
>

I read some anthropology about Kerala suggesting high literacy and a
willingness to talk everything though led to optimized solutions that went
a lot further to solving problems than hasty "throw money at it" solutions
of more wasteful peoples / governments. Kerala has good stats (infant
mortality low etc.), or did at the time.

> a
> > glimpse of where the dog-wagging occurs:
> >
> > http://youtu.be/2YBtspm8j8M
> >

>


> I saw some (most?) of it - but did not 'get it': it seems to start out
> with some tricky visuals and goes into an advertisement for an (Indian)
> product called 'Sun Silk' - doubtless this is some 'advertising war' that's
> going on behind the scenes!! I shall give it another try in due course.
>
>

Strange, sounds like a different video.

The one I saw was 2 mins 49 secs using stock footage with the narrator
reminding us the cliches used by advertisers. Nothing about 'Sun Silk'.

Kirby



> GSC
>




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