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Topic: 2.25 - The meaning of "implies" in mythmatics.
Replies: 2   Last Post: Jul 24, 2014 7:16 PM

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Dan Christensen

Posts: 2,617
Registered: 7/9/08
Re: 2.25 - The meaning of "implies" in mythmatics.
Posted: Jul 24, 2014 3:02 PM
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On Thursday, July 24, 2014 12:12:14 PM UTC-4, John Gabriel wrote:
> On Thursday, 24 July 2014 16:34:25 UTC+2, YBM wrote:
>

> > Le 24/07/2014 16:11, John Gabriel a �crit :
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> >
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> > > Stupid takes on new meaning with YBM.
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> > >
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> > > It's too funny watching him making mistake after mistake. What an idiot!
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> >
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> > >
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> > > A simple look at the imply table proves conclusively that if p is FALSE, then q is ALWAYS TRUE.
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> > Not so, John, it is not so. Just look at the first line:
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> > p q p=>q
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> > -------------
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> > * F F T
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> > F T 1
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> > T F F
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> > T T T
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> > See? p is FALSE, p=>q is TRUE, q is FALSE
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> "If John Gabriel is always right, then John Gabriel is never wrong."
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> p= John Gabriel is always right
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> q= John Gabriel is never wrong
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>


Suppose, instead, q = pigs can fly.

Then we would have: If John Gabriel is always right (obviously false) then pigs can fly.

This would be true whether or not pigs can actually fly. Get it now, Crank Boy?

Dan
Download my DC Proof 2.0 software at http://www.dcproof.com
Visit my Math Blog at http://www.dcproof.wordpress.com






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