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Topic: Dy/Dan's Latest
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kirby urner

Posts: 2,578
Registered: 11/29/05
Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Posted: Aug 9, 2014 10:31 AM
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Sorry, I replaced versus replied to my own earlier post.
Here's the first, then the second:

====

From: kirby urner <kirby.urner@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, Aug 9, 2014 at 7:31 AM
Subject: Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
To: Math-teach Teach <math-teach@mathforum.org>


On Fri, Aug 1, 2014 at 8:52 PM, GS Chandy <chandy.sag@gmail.com> wrote:
<< SNIP >>


> I've had a fair amount of experience with Indians and
> people of other nationalities at various income-levels -
> and I am able definitely to confirm that people are
> pretty intelligent all around the world. (Leaving the
> real 'outliers', like Ramanujam, etc, out of the picture:
> we have no way at all of measuring how they function,
> what makes them tick).


Yeah, Ramanujan was freaky smart, in ways that put him in
a special category. I don't know how he'd have fared on
an IQ test though. Did anyone administer one I wonder?
Sometimes these mutant intellects are especially good in
a peculiar way that your Stanford Benet or whatever it's
called doesn't really measure.

Speaking of Ramanujan, I use one of his expressions for
pi as a test of MathML using a JavaScript library called
MathJax, useful for embedding mathematical notation in
the Document Object Model. Test your browser here:

http://worldgame.blogspot.com/2012/01/testing-math-ml.html


> In some nations, many people at large get a pretty
> fair chance to express and demonstrate their
> intelligence, talents etc - the USA is probably one of
> the higher ranking such nations.


This has been the PR, yes, that "freedom of opportunity"
notion. To some extent it's still true, however raw
talent takes grooming and encouragement to mature into
usable skills in many cases, and your school may not
encourage "standing out from one's peers".

For example the boarding schools set up to educate
native Americans in the ways of the Anglo-Euro immigrants
were all about snuffing out those skills that would have
been admired back at the encampment or village, where a
few tribal elders would be holding on to those remnants
of the culture.

Quakers have a lot of empathy for native Americans and
yet have been party to just such brain washing
institutions, because they saw no hope of preserving
native cultures.

Since the 1960s, however, their eyes have been opened in
that respect, as native American cultures made come back
and those boarding schools are now a thing of the past.


> In several other nations (India is a prime example),
> a lot more depends on contacts, whom you know, etc, etc
> rather than on your intelligence, hard work, etc.
> Things have changed quite a bit over the past 20 years
> or so, but by no means have things changed enough!


> My OPMS was conceived and is primarily being
> developed hopefully to impact the local culture. It
> does have to do with problem solving in 'general
> systems' - it's a tool developed from ideas in what
> Iirby has been referring to as GST (actually, from
> Warfield's developments and extensions of GST, and
> further insights).


I'm interested in applying GST within Quakerism and
helping others come to appreciate its power.

We've talked about Kenneth Boulding already. He was one
of our guiding lights when it came to moving Economics,
as a discipline, in the more eco-friendly direction of
GST. I see parallels between what's happening to
Economics (becoming more grounded in science, thanks to
GST), and Mathematics, which is becoming more CS-friendly
in the early grades.


> Do we have enough time for India to recover from
> her 'Two Hundred Years of Servitude'?


>

> I don't know. What I DO know that - notwithstanding
> vicious thinking such as shown by 'israeliteknight' -
> we've come a fair distance since the British left us as
> the world's basket case, more or less: our progress,
> though quite remarkable, has been nowhere near enough
> (IMO).


> GSC

One tool GST needs to make more use of I think is the
Graph Database. That's a database made from boxes and
arrows like those organizational diagrams, where both the
boxes and arrows have properties.

We need these to diagram family structures for example.
Lots of Somalis are coming to Portland thanks to Somalia
imploding as a nation (so many nations are non-viable)
and the refugees are coming here. According to US /
state laws, if a guy in Somalia has two wives, he'll have
to demote one of them to "house guest" or something extra-
marital as no forms of polygamy are legal -- except Time
magazine has implied this is changing.

http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2120495,00.html

In a graph database, we can preserve the family structure
with "is married to" arrows, yet those arrows have
properties such that "state recognized" may be set to
False or True.

That way, a Quaker-designed database aimed at tracking
new immigrant families is able to reflect more than just
the dumbed down "nuclear family" projection and keep the
actual structure (possibly more "molecular") on file.

We have a history of distinguishing marriages on the
basis of whether they're state-recognized or not already,
given we'll sometimes authorize couples a state will
not. With properties attached to relationships, one may
store and retrieve this information with ease.

Implication for CS-friendly algebra courses: don't just
look at SQL running against PostgreSQL or MariaDB; check
out Cypher running against Neo4j. These are all free and
open source tools so I'm not talking about big budget
schools implementing these upgrades, just savvy ones,
like we Quakers administer.

Kirby

====

> Implication for CS-friendly algebra courses: don't just look at SQL running
> against PostgreSQL or MariaDB; check out Cypher running against Neo4j.
> These are all free and open source tools so I'm not talking about big
> budget schools implementing these upgrades, just savvy ones, like we
> Quakers administer.


> Kirby

===

Here's a rough mock-up of what Cypher looks like, similar to SQL but
different.

Scenario:

George Fox is a candidate for membership. Oversight Committee
approves a clearness committee and puts two people on it. The
Committee recommends approval and Business Meeting complies.
In the meantime, George has been nominated to serve on Oversight
itself.

MATCH (m:Individual {name: "George Fox"})
CREATE m -[:NOMINATED_FOR]-> (o:Committee {name ="Oversight"})
CREATE m -[:IS_A]-> (c:Candidate_for_Membership) <-[:APPROVED_BY]- o
CREATE (cc:Committee {name: "Clearness"}) <-[:CREATED_BY]- o
MATCH (u:Individual {name: "Kirby Urner"})
MATCH (v:Individual {name: "Lucretia Mott"})
CREATE u -[:SERVES_ON]-> cc
CREATE v -[:SERVES_ON]-> cc

CREATE m -[:NOMINATED_FOR]-> o
CREATE c <-[:RECOMMENDED]- cc
CREATE c <-[:APPROVED]- Committee {Name: "Meeting4Business"}
CREATE m -[:SERVES_ON]-> o
CREATE m -[:ATTENDED]-> o:{Committee_Meeting {Date: "12/12/2015"}

The uppercase names in square brackets, following colons, are :RELATIONSHIPS
which, like Nodes (Individual, Committee...) have properties.

Examples:

:NOMINATED_FOR:
start_date
end_date
pending: Y/N

:SERVES_ON
start_date
end_date
resigned: Y/N
clerk: Y/N
ex oficio: Y/N

:RECOMMENDED
Date_of:
At_Meeting:
Minute:

:APPROVED
Date_of:
At_Meeting:
Minute:

A graph database like this could answer such queries as:

* Show me every committee individual X has served on in the last decade.
* Call up all ongoing clearness committees with the clerk of each one.
* Show nominating committee's most current slate of candidates
* Show membership transfers that are pending
* Show membership transfers completed in the last six months

and so on.

Graph databases fit under the heading of NOSQL i.e. "not only" SQL, where
SQL comprises the traditional rows-in-tables design of relational databases.
Modeling a school, meeting, church, or company is one logical place to
start when introducing graph databases. Start with something students
already have some experience with, so the notation expresses facts and
procedures that are already familiar.


Kirby


Message was edited by: kirby urner


Date Subject Author
7/25/14
Read Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/26/14
Read RE: Dy/Dan's Latest
Bishop, Wayne
7/26/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/26/14
Read RE: Dy/Dan's Latest
Bishop, Wayne
7/26/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Richard Strausz
7/26/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/26/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
7/26/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/26/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/27/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Richard Strausz
7/27/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/27/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/27/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/27/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Richard Strausz
7/27/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Richard Strausz
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/27/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Richard Strausz
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Richard Strausz
7/28/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Robert Hansen
7/29/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Richard Strausz
7/29/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
7/30/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
israeliteknight
8/1/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
8/1/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
Richard Strausz
8/1/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
8/4/14
Read RE: Dy/Dan's Latest
Bishop, Wayne
8/11/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
kirby urner
8/10/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
8/11/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
8/11/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
8/12/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
kirby urner
8/12/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy
8/12/14
Read Re: Dy/Dan's Latest
GS Chandy

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