Date: Mar 1, 2013 9:50 AM
Author: William Hughes
Subject: Re: Matheology § 222 Back to the roots

On Mar 1, 2:47 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
> On 1 Mrz., 13:14, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > On Mar 1, 12:19 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
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> > > On 28 Feb., 23:40, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
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> > > > On Feb 28, 11:29 pm, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
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> > > > > I think that there is a variable maximum or limit that depends (among
> > > > > others) on t.

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> > > > So what did the statement
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> > > >     There is no m(t).
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> > > > mean?
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> > > We cannot fix it in the sense required for "there is" of current
> > > mathematics.

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> > So at a given time t,
> > m has a value which is a
> > natural number, but we cannot
> > assign this natural number
> > to a function.

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> Can you find a largest natural number in your personal environment?
> Can you determine the largest natural number that your computer is
> able to compute?
>


Well, I don't know the values, but I certainly can assume
they exist and do not change if time does not change. So I can
have a(t), the largest number in my personal environment
at time t, and b(t) the largest number that my computer
is able to calculate at time t. (I don't suppose that
the largest number that a given computer is able to
compute can change, but certainly the computer
referred to as "my computer" can change).
I only need assume that the value of m exits and
does not change if time does not change and then
I can assign the value of m to a function of time.