Date: Apr 6, 2013 7:01 AM
Author: mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de
Subject: Re: Matheology § 224

On 6 Apr., 12:02, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Apr 6, 11:42 am, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
>

> > On 5 Apr., 23:50, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > Then G has an infinite number of
> > > elements, but you cannot name a single element of G.-

>
> > In D\E we have another situation. If someone claims that D\E contains
> > an element e, then we can prove that it is not an element of D\E by
> > induction, since E is an inductive set. This makes D\E being the empty
> > set.

>
> E does not change.


Then you should not dare to name one of the elements of D\E.
I would immediately be able to prove that it is not in D\E.

> E is not D so D\E is not the empty set.

Prove it by naming an element of D that is not in E! For well-defined
and fixed sets, this would be possible - in mathematics at least.

Regards, WM