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Topic: Topic 5 - The Beginning of the End
Replies: 12   Last Post: Oct 11, 2012 12:34 PM

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GS Chandy

Posts: 6,728
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
Re: Topic 5 - The Beginning of the End
Posted: Oct 9, 2012 2:48 AM
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Robert Hansen (RH) posted Oct 9, 2012 4:48 AM:
>
> It's the same issue. Consider...
>
> Be able to poke holes.
> Be able to scrape.
> Be able to pry.
> Be able to twist.
>
> I am describing what a screwdriver can do. If I
> wanted to teach you about screwdrivers I would start
> with a screwdriver, not its use cases. Likewise, to
> teach you arithmetic I would start by teaching you
> arithmetic, not its use cases. I think I am going to
> clean that up and call it the fundamental rule of
> teaching.
>
> That is the problem with designing a curriculum
> around a list of standards. If teachers would just
> teach arithmetic first, and well, most of the use
> cases will follow. The rest will follow as you start
> applying arithmetic to problems. What is the point of
> teaching students the multiplication facts, and at
> the same time, the distributive property? What are
> they going to distribute? Every topic of this series
> is approached in this manner. Garbled with half a
> dozen use cases of something that hasn't even been
> fully taught yet.
>
> Bob Hansen
>

I once had a chemistry teacher who informed us very true and necessary things like:

- -- This is a test-tube
- -- This is a beaker...
+++
- -- This is air
- -- This is nitrogen
(Much to everyone's surprise - but not our teacher's - they both looked the same!)
+++
...
...
(and so on). [That's a bit of an exaggeration - but only slightly so].

I'm afraid none of us learned much chemistry.

Suggestion:
The better way to enable learning would be to provide an instance of the 'thing' in question AND to demonstrate its properties/uses/use cases.

To me, the above seems obvious and utterly commonsensical. Above all, instead of going by RIGID rules, let the rules be made by the learner's needs, his/her curiosity.

What that chemistry teacher did was ALL WRONG! (As is what RH is suggesting).

GSC
("Still Shoveling Away!" - with apologies if due to Barry Garelick for any tedium caused; and a humble suggestion that all such tedium would be avoided by simply not looking at any message that is purported to be from GSC)


Message was edited by: GS Chandy



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