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Topic: 4-dimensional geometry
Replies: 1   Last Post: Mar 13, 2007 10:16 AM

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norman shapiro

Posts: 9
From: 330 W 28 St, Apt 7A, NYC, NY 11516
Registered: 6/8/05
Re: 4-dimensional geometry
Posted: Mar 13, 2007 10:16 AM
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I say outright, I'm in the dark. But it would seem to me that what you propose is not doable with your premises fixed Euclidean Geometry. Newton's geometry and Einstein's geometry may be the place to go to.
Newton had to invent calculus in order to carry out his efforts. My guess is that he built with a geometry that added calculus to that of the Euclid. Einstein found that wanting. In his thinking, Time was relative. Einstein's constant was the speed of light. All else was relative.

This week we went into daylight saving time earlier than we had last year. It seems that the geometry of our solar calendar is not precise. Our rotations around the sun are not according to our geometry which is platonic, not based on precise empirical measurements.

There are even arguments over who is the 'decider' as to how we measure Time. Quantum Time vs Solar Time?? Can a compromise be worked out? Thee two have not compatibility.....

creating a grid for 4D space I suspect has Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to contend with too. That is to say, when you know where something is, you do not know when it was there. Or, put in another way, when you know when something was, you don't know where it is.

A good book I'd recommend to you is one I now am reading: 'The Discoveries' by Alan Lightman Pantheon Books, NY 2005



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