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Topic: Rigid body equations
Replies: 6   Last Post: Mar 9, 2007 2:04 AM

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Paul Abbott

Posts: 1,437
Registered: 12/7/04
Re: Rigid body equations
Posted: Mar 5, 2007 5:02 AM
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In article <esdjgh$ooe$1@smc.vnet.net>,
Robert Pigeon <robert.pigeon@videotron.ca> wrote:

> Does any one worked out the rigid body equations (in 3D) in a notebook? I
> have to "simulate" the dynamics of an helicopter at work and most people are
> using other systems. I prefer to work with Mathematica for reasons
> that should be obvious to people in this list! But it is not for my
> colleagues at work.
> It will be an interesting challange to implement those equations in
> Mathematica. At the end I will want to input some initial conditions (like
> speed, trun speed,...) and get the dynamics (new speed, attitude,...).
> Good references will be appreciated also... !


Perhaps relevant is

"The Rotational Dynamics of Mir" by Michael Foale of NASA
URL: http://library.wolfram.com/conferences/conference98/

See also

http://www.mathematica-journal.com/issue/v7i3/special/transcript/html/

and

http://www.mathematica-journal.com/issue/v7i3/special/html/index.html

Cheers,
Paul

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Paul Abbott Phone: 61 8 6488 2734
School of Physics, M013 Fax: +61 8 6488 1014
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