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Topic: Calc books
Replies: 2   Last Post: May 28, 1997 7:50 PM

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Claude Paradis

Posts: 6
Registered: 12/6/04
Calc books
Posted: May 23, 1997 12:20 AM
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Those looking for Calc books should check out "CALCULUS, from graphical,
numerical, and symbolic points of view," by Arnold Ostebee & Paul Zorn of
St. Olaf College. Its popularity on the college scene is right behind the
Harvard series nationally, but I think you'll find it better put together.
It's organized from the calculus reform, or renewal, approach and has
students emphasize mathematics while de-emphasizing MSM (mindless symbolic
manipulation) although there's plenty of SM for those who like that
approach. Just email Alexa Epstein, senior editor at Saunders College
Publishers and she'll send you info and even examination materials if what
you see interests you. She's at: AEpstein@saunderscollege.com

At the recent NCTM convention, I also picked up Foerster, which was
strongly recommended since it was written by a HS teacher with the new AP
curriculum in mind. I like it, but I like the flavor of the OZ materials
better. The approach is quite different for those used to traditional
texts, but it presents math as I think it should be presented. Our school
will be changing to Ostebee & Zorn (OZ) for next year.

Claude Paradis

Math Teacher
Cooper High School
8230 47th Ave N
New Hope, MN 55428
(612) 504-8611






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